How to make your blog a secure and trusted place

If you run a self-hosted blog – like WordPress, for instance – now’s the time to enhance your confidence and that of your visitors and community in its security and trust. While this is mostly about data security, it’s also about search engine optimization and search results ranking by Google. I’m talking about enabling https, the secure form of http (hence the ‘s’) that offers important benefits: In its popular deployment on the internet, HTTPS provides authentication of the website and associated web server

Developing peace of mind with WordPress plugins

Whenever a new release of the WordPress content management system comes out, I’m usually on it immediately, updating all my sites running WordPress to that latest version. But not this time. Not yet. Version 4.4 of WordPress was released on December 8, but I’m still on WordPress 4.3.1, the immediately preceding version. The reason? It’s about plugins, the eminently useful add-on software you install that adds additional or improved functionality in many different ways to the core of WordPress itself.

wordcamplondon2015

The richness of WordCamp London 2015

#wcldn (@ WordCamp London) https://t.co/RpOQMSlSQ7 pic.twitter.com/ZFgx9DWeFA — Neville Hobson (@jangles) March 21, 2015 This past weekend, as many as 600 people got together in North London to talk about things WordPress, the content management system that is the platform of choice for more than 75 million websites worldwide, and is in a market-leading position with blogs. It was WordCamp London 2015, a three-day event comprising a contributor day on Friday, and the two-day conference over the weekend that I attended,

Just a bit less minimalist

About a month ago, I made a big change to this website when I redesigned it and combined the blog with my business website, with both on the same single domain. At the time, I talked up my strong feeling about a minimalist approach to a presence on the social web, doing away with all the clutter that tends to populate so many websites with widgets, ads, popups galore, and more. If you observed that change and have visited this

A minimalist approach

[Updated July 27: Today I reverted to the Genesis Framework and the eleven40 Pro child theme. Concise reasoning in today’s post about the change.] Today I re-booted this website. It has a new look and feel, quite a bit different to what went before it. And the domain on which the blog has run since 2006 is also now home to the separate business website I’ve had for some years. So everything you want to know about me is housed under

The mutual value of the conversation

The stats helper monkeys have been busy, said WordPress in an overnight email telling me about “Your 2013 in blogging,” a concise analysis of this blog during the year as noted by the stats module in Jetpack, the uber-plugin utility for self-hosted WordPress sites. It’s a concise portrayal of a range of metrics that are useful to know. For instance: The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 170,000 times in 2013. If it

Connecting content and the social conversations

A topic Shel and I discuss in this week’s FIR podcast episode 715 is commenting on blogs. More specifically, about the conversation that can happen in response to a post someone writes and publishes on a blog, and where the conversation actually takes place. Increasingly, it’s not on the blog itself – it’s on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, anywhere across the social web except in the comments section of the blog post that prompted someone to add their two pence-worth. Here’s

Bloggade 2013: the nuts and bolts of blogging and WordPress

Have you ever wondered what goes on at a data centre, perhaps one that hosts your website or blog? If that’s a question you’ve asked before, then here’s your chance to get the answer. A tour of a state-of-the-art UK data centre in Newark is a central part of an event taking place on August 21 that will focus on the underlying technology that powers many WordPress blogs. I’ve joined Matt Russell, CEO of WebHostingBuzz (the hosting service that sponsors

WordPress 3.6 – blogging gets even easier

A new version of the WordPress blogging platform and content management system was released on August 1 that not only fixes some bugs and improves security, but also brings a raft of new and enhanced features and functionality. WordPress version 3.6 includes a new default theme, Twenty Thirteen, with a contemporary look and feel that lets you focus on your content far more than before, in a design made for media-rich blogging. As the theme is a responsive web design

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