Klout score takes off with American Airlines

To many people, one of the appealing benefits of a good score on influence ranking services is that you can take advantage of perks – free products, services or experiences offered to you based on how high your rank or score is. Each of the Big Three such services – Klout, Kred and PeerIndex – has its own perks programme. The company that has it down to a fine marketing art in the US is Klout with its associations with big brands such as Microsoft, Sony, Cirque du Soleil, T-Mobile and, they say, over 300 more. Now Klout adds American Airlines to its perks roster in a deal that gives Klout users access to nearly 40 worldwide lounge locations including […]

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The reality of influence discrimination

Do people discriminate against you because of your score or rank from an influence measurement service like Klout? A thought-provoking post by Kerry Gorgone writing in Marketing Profs argues that, yes, it happens, and offers some advice to employers and would-be employees: […] A note to employers: Don’t rely too heavily on any one metric when hiring someone. Years of experience and demonstrated success in the industry should mean more than a relatively new online scoring algorithm. In addition, don’t dig too deeply into a candidate’s topics of influence. You can’t “unsee” something like an affiliation with a particular political party or cause, and even if you weren’t actually discriminating based on this affiliation, it might look as though you […]

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Will Klout ever let you go?

In November 2011, I quit Klout. Totally and completely. Not only did I close the account, but also I cancelled permissions to allow Klout to connect to each of the online social places to which I’d previously given it permission. That included manually removing permissions from Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare and others I can’t recall. Now and again, I checked to be sure I wasn’t on Klout: if I went to www.klout.com/jangles, I’d get a 404 error. Precisely what I’d expect when Klout had told me last November “You will be removed from Klout.com within 24-48 hours” as noted in the screenshot above of the confirmation message I got once I’d done the terminating click. Today, I decided to […]

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Influence rank: the shape of recruitment to come

If your job embraces community building and engagement across the social web, does your ranking on an online influence-measurement service like Klout matter? For some companies and recruiters, it certainly does. A case in point – Salesforce.com has a job ad for a community manager where the list of desired skills includes this: Klout score of 35 or higher According to Klout, the Klout Score or ranking “measures influence based on your ability to drive action. Every time you create content or engage you influence others.” It uses data from social networks to measure True Reach (“how many people you influence”), Amplification (“how much you influence them”) and Network Impact (“the influence of your network”). The job Salesforce is hiring […]

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In Defence Of Influence Metrics

Is Klout getting a bum rap, spitefully pilloried in critical commentary such as my post on November 12 on opting out of Klout? Guest author Tammy Kahn Fennell believes that services like Klout and PeerIndex deserve fairer assessment. Let me open with this. I am not invested in any influence score company. My company, MarketMeSuite integrates with Klout and Peer Index as one of about 20 other integrations. And we also have the option to turn off influence entirely.  I am writing this because from where I’m standing, influence (specifically Klout) is being given a bad name not because of what it measures, but because how the company profits from it. I thought it was time to think long and […]

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