Domino’s Pizza: You’ve come a long way, baby!

One of the learning examples of how some businesses go through a baptism of fire in addressing a genuine crisis, and the role social media plays in fuelling discussion, online and offline, is the experience of Domino’s Pizza early in 2009. That experience revolved around the acts of two employees at a franchise store in the US who videoed themselves doing some disgusting things when preparing customers’ pizzas, and uploaded the videos to YouTube. Domino’s name was all over the embryonic social web in a rapidly-escalating crisis that assaulted their reputation and shook consumer confidence and trust. All that was compounded by the lack of an official voice of Domino’s in the conversations until a belated entry to participation via […]

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Note to Domino’s Pizza: News travels fast, especially when it’s bad

(This post was updated during April 15 as events evolved: scroll down to see additional commentary.) A public relations disaster of potentially epic proportions is brewing for Domino’s Pizza following the antics of two employees and a video on YouTube. You can read the gruesome details at Consumerist but, concisely, it happened over the Easter weekend and involves one employee doing disgusting things with the ingredients while making up pizzas, while the other employee records it all on a camcorder with commentary. It’s fair to say that Domino’s acted swiftly once they’d been alerted by alarmed consumers, as the Consumerist reports make clear. The employees concerned – working for a Domino’s franchisee in North Carolina, USA – have been fired. […]

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