The over-arching strategy for Google+

One of the characteristics of any conversation about Google+ is a view that not many people actually use it – mostly the “users” versus “active users” argument – and how it will fail as it’s not like Facebook or Twitter as a social network. Speaking as an “active user” since Google field trialled Google+ in mid 2011, I’d agree with that latter point – it isn’t like Facebook or Twitter. Don’t take my word for it, though – hear what a voice of Google has to say on the matter. The Drum reports on Google UK’s head of agency sales, Matt Bush, speaking at an event during Social Media Week London this week: We don’t want to be another Facebook […]

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Google makes it easier for people to find and amplify trusted content

Of two new Google+ features announced yesterday by Google – authorship attribution and embedding posts – the latter caught my imagination straightaway. If you want to embed a post published publicly on Google+, you can now embed that content in your own blog or website by simply adding a few pieces of code. Making it happen is quite easy: […] If you’re a site owner and you’d like to embed a post, simply find a public post on Google+, and select ‘Embed post’ from the drop-down menu. Copy the code, add it to your web page, and you’re all set! And here’s what an embedded Google+ post looks like: (If, for any reason, you don’t see the G+ post above, […]

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Connecting content and the social conversations

A topic Shel and I discuss in this week’s FIR podcast episode 715 is commenting on blogs. More specifically, about the conversation that can happen in response to a post someone writes and publishes on a blog, and where the conversation actually takes place. Increasingly, it’s not on the blog itself – it’s on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, anywhere across the social web except in the comments section of the blog post that prompted someone to add their two pence-worth. Here’s an example: as the screenshot above illustrates – from a post I wrote last week about The Sun’s new paywall – there are no comments to the post directly, but ten comments across Twitter and Facebook that reference the post. […]

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Can Google Hangouts replace press conferences?

Faced with the problem of how to reconcile arranging a press conference for a VIP with the lack of a hard news story, independent communications consultancy Keene Communications adopted a different approach, one that might interest you. Guest writer Michael White explains. This is a story of why we chose to replace a press conference with a Google Hangout On Air and invited bloggers to participate instead of journalists. The results suggest that these types of events could offer a realistic alternative to press conferences and that bloggers could replace journalists as the primary audience that a PR has to engage with. Fighting words? Then you decide. Many PR agencies will recognise this challenge (probably some in house PROs too). […]

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Author rank a key element in content marketing

“Content marketing” is a phrase to get accustomed to, if you’re not familiar with it already. It elevates the humble-sounding crafts of copywriting, video-making, writing blog posts, email newsletters and other methods of content creation and marketing that we’re used to onto an entirely new level. That level is where the new game of business is played, one that’s online, connected, Googled, measured, highly visible and eminently social. Creating and publishing great content is an activity that is becoming central to the measurable business goals of many organizations. In the UK, for instance, an online survey last month said that 97 percent of those surveyed will increase or maintain the amount they spend on content marketing in 2013. To understand […]

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