QR codes at heart of lost-and-found service Belon.gs

belongsqrlabel

A topic I’ve written about frequently here is QR codes, those square, random-looking black-and-white images that are meaningless to the eye but content-rich to a cameraphone and some barcode-scanning software.

These little barcodes are popping up everywhere these days, and how they’re being used by marketers attracts praise and derision in almost equal measure.

Given my glass-half-full approach to such matters, I love discovering imaginative uses of these powerful little tools.And here’s an interesting one – QR codes as an integral element of a new service describing itself as “the next generation global lost-and-found service.”

Finnish/US startup Belongs launched its service in beta last month. What it does is simple as its launch announcement says:

[...] Order free tag stickers from the Belon.gs website (www.belon.gs), claim them online and stick them to your valuables. When your item gets lost, the finder can scan the tag’s QR code with their smartphone or access the web address on the tag. The owner is automatically notified, and anonymous chat is established between the two parties to arrange the return of the lost item. To further incentivize the returning of valuables, Belongs supports setting rewards for found items through PayPal, and the Belongs technology will streamline the transfer of the reward from owner to finder.

The service is free for individuals – there is a paid service for businesses – so I signed up and ordered some free tag stickers, which arrived in the post from the US a few days ago.

Setting up an item with a tag and sticker is simplicity itself. What you do is use one of the QR code stickers for a valuable (a netbook computer, for instance), go to the Belongs website via your computer or mobile device and describe that item in your Belongs account, and stick the rectangular sticker to the item. The stickers are quite small, about one inch by half an inch (about 25mm x 13mm).

The image at top shows one I did, stuck to a netbook just beneath the sticker with the Windows product information. If you scan the QR code – a unique one for each of your valuables – with your smartphone or go to the web address shown on the sticker, you’ll get a description page about the valuable with information on what to do next.

You can offer a reward if your item does get lost and someone finds it and makes contact with Belongs via the QR code sticker, which I did; setting that up via PayPal is also a simple procedure.

So you have your stuff tagged and stickered and you venture out on your travels with confidence! Belongs says its job is to “encourage good deeds” where basic honesty will prevail when someone finds your valuable that you’ve lost.

They describe such altruism thus:

    • Enabling you to tag your items with our high quality personalized tag stickers
    • Letting you offer a reward for your item
    • Making it possible for finders to receive a reward for the good deed
    • Offering full anonymity for everybody
    • Offering our services internationally and multilingually
    • Making it as easy and trustworthy as possible
    • Giving Belon.gs tags for free for the people

I’d like to think the same although I also have a pragmatic view where if you do lose your netbook, iPhone, iPad, camera or whatever it might be, file an insurance claim rather than only wait for a Good Samaritan to get in touch with Belongs.

I’ve been wondering where the monetization for Belongs lies, and clearly that must be primarily in the paid service for businesses that enters into the realm of enterprise asset management. For individuals and small businesses, the free service would be fine (and you can donate to Belongs if you wish to, which I did).

Time will tell how successful Belongs will be (and how honest people are), But I love the idea and imagination behind the use of QR codes in this way.

The future for QR codes can be rosy

whattheuserdoes500

Whenever I read reports that assess how poorly QR codes and other barcodes are doing, and the unhappy outlook for their future, I’m always reminded of Hugh McLeod’s classic cartoon from 2007 you see here.

A new report from eMarketer says that QR codes aren’t giving consumers what they want.

[...] “What consumers want from their 2-D barcode experience and what brands deliver are typically at odds,” said eMarketer. “Consumers want deals and discounts. Brands want to deliver information.”

[...] Poorly aligned consumer-brand expectations for mobile barcode-linked content and inadequate user experiences are driving consumers away from mobile barcode use. “Until marketers move beyond the practice of pushing content to consumers via mobile barcodes, and instead give consumers what they want … many consumers will continue to consider their first mobile barcode experience their last,” said eMarketer.

This hits the nail right on the head. I would agree that many uses of such barcodes really do lack imagination. It’s becoming common to see these images on all sorts of brand packaging, magazine ads and more, yet offer little compulsion to do anything especially when it’s still far from easy for most people to make use of this relatively-simple technology.

When you see it done well, though, it’s something to be excited about when you think what some imagination can do.

What needs to happen is that, unlike at present, barcode-scanning software should come built-in with your smartphone. All you’d have to do is point your device’s camera at a QR code or other barcode for it to do its thing.

No loading up, clicking, tapping or what-have-you.

A really good product that I use is Barcode Scanner, a free app for Android that does exactly what it says – scans barcodes including QR codes. Its simplicity is key: once you load it, you point your device and it does its thing.

Another good example is Amazon’s mobile app for Android – it includes a barcode scanner so you can scan a product in a store, for example, and the app looks it up in Amazon’s inventory and presents it to you on your smartphone. Handy when you’re out comparison-shopping.

Until that day arrives, though, marketers can help themselves in three simple ways:

  1. Understand what consumers want. (I’d argue that consumers don’t always or even necessarily want discounts – what they really want is something compelling.)
  2. Offer consumers a genuinely high expectation of something compelling from your QR code that makes a breeze of the current process of finding some software, installing it on a device and scanning a code.
  3. Help those consumers be delighted with their experience via your QR code by applying your imagination.

Whether the end result is a discount or something really user-compelling, what happens at that point is the make or break for that part of your user/brand engagement.

It’s not what the software does, it’s what the user does.

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QR codes at the heart of Monmouthpedia

monmouthpedia

An interesting experiment gets its official launch this weekend when Monmouthpedia formally kicks off today.

The Welsh town of Monmouth is the focus of this Wikipedia project that aims to create physical connections between places throughout the town, and events in its history, with respective content on Wikipedia.

According to the description on Wikipedia:

[...] The project aims to cover every single notable place, person, artefact, plant, animal and other things in Monmouth in as many languages as possible, but with a special focus on Welsh. This is a different scale of wiki-project. The project is jointly funded by Monmouthshire County Council and Wikimedia UK. Monmouthshire County Council intend to install free town wide Wi-Fi for the project.

What this means in practice is that when you visit Monmouth – a town with a rich history as this Monmouthpedia infographic illustrates – you’ll encounter visual clues everywhere that let you know that detailed information about the thing on which the clue is attached is available on Wikipedia.

The ways in which the clues will be displayed are many:

    • Larger ceramic or metal plaques for places exposed to the elements for articles specific to Monmouth.
    • Smaller plastic, ceramic or metal plaques for labelling objects non specific to Monmouth, e.g. for use in the Flora and Fauna guide.
    • Labels for use inside buildings, e.g. for objects in museums.
    • Glass stickers in the windows of shops to give information on their professions.
    • In addition there will be information posters, signs, notice boards and leaflets to help people contribute and stay informed.

And the visual clues themselves? QR codes.

monmouthpediaqrshirehall

If you have a smartphone and a QR code-scanning app (for Android smartphones, a good one is Barcode Scanner), you just scan the code and the relevant Wikipedia page will open on your device. As free wifi-fi will blanket Monmouth, no worries about connectivity costs.

What’s especially clever is that the page you get on your mobile device can be in any one of about 25 languages. Here’s how that works:

When a user scans a QRpedia QR code on their mobile device, the device decodes the QR code into a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) using the domain name “qrwp.org” and whose path (final part) is the title of a Wikipedia article, and sends a request for the article specified in the URL to the QRpedia web server. It also transmits the language setting of the device.

The QRpedia server then uses Wikipedia’s API to determine whether there is a version of the specified Wikipedia article in the language used by the device, and if so, returns it in a mobile-friendly format. If there is no version of the article available in the preferred language, then the QRpedia server offers a choice of the available languages, or a Google translation.

In this way, one QRcode can deliver the same article in many languages, even when the museum is unable to make its own translations. QRpedia also records usage statistics.

That’s what I call imagination.

If you’re interested in how this grand experiment will develop – Monmouth has been dubbed “The world’s first Wikipedia town” – keep an eye on the website and the blog. You can also connect on Twitter: @MonmouthpediA. Follow the hashtag #MonmouthpediA.

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A little imagination is key to success with QR codes

heinzqrcode“QR codes are a waste of time” is a phrase I hear often. While they are becoming more of a feature in brand marketing campaigns, I would agree with critics that how they’re included too often adds little to a campaign.

I think it’s not so much that the codes themselves are a waste of time – that’s like saying Twitter is a waste of time because someone’s tweets aren’t very interesting -  it’s more how people employ them.

For instance, it seems to me that linking your QR code to a website that’s suited to desktop use (ie, a large screen), has lots of graphics, Flash movies, etc, really is pointless and does absolutely nothing for your campaign. Remember, people will be scanning the codes on mobile devices, not desktop or other big-screen computers, and expecting something of value when they get the result from scanning the code.

Then there are poorly thought-out interaction ideas. I’m beginning to lose count of how many vans and other small commercial vehicles I see on the roads with QR codes stuck on the side or the back. Especially terrific when you’re stuck in the traffic jam approaching the Hammersmith flyover :)

Check these examples of how not to use QR codes posted earlier this year by Econsultancy (my favourite: the QR code on the side of a building that looks to be at least 6 metres off the ground…).

If the end result of the journey from the code is such a poor (or even missed) experience, you’re more likely to switch off your consumer entirely.

So when QR codes play an imaginative role in marketing that enables a consumer to get to the pot of gold that you want him or her to, it’s good to see. And there are some good examples that balance the disasters as Econsultancy highlights in another post a few days ago describing six great examples of QR code uses that illustrate what you can do if you have some imagination (and an effective campaign plan).

In each of the six examples – from German retailer MyToys.de, US food company HJ Heinz, South Korean retailer Emart, US chemical firm Dow Chemical, Transport for London, and French cosmetics firm L’Oréal – Econsultancy concisely describes the QR code use and then includes some credible analysis and metrics on the results.

While all of them are good examples, one in particular stands out to me because it is so imaginative – Emart’s use of light and shadow at a specific time of day to activate a QR code to support its Sunny Sale campaign.

(If you don’t see the video embedded above, watch it at YouTube.)

I saw that friend Michael Netzley in Singapore posted the video, saying that it’s “maybe the smartest use of a QR code I have ever seen.” You can also hear his views about it in episode 650 of the FIR podcast when it’s published on May 7 (this is the weekly business podcast I co-host with Shel Holtz and for which Michael is a regular contributor).

Imagination – it’s a great commodity especially when there’s a lot of it.

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Three things to make QR codes worthwhile

No surprises in this AdAge story about widespread use of QR codes that haven’t captured consumer imagination when it includes this statement:

“Experts cite three reasons that QR codes haven’t caught on.

First, people are confused about how to scan them.

Two, there’s little uniformity among the apps required to read them.

Last, some who have tried the technology were dissuaded by codes that offer little useful information or simply redirect the user to the company’s website.

None of this deters marketers, who seem to be slapping the codes on products for all age groups and demographics.”

Those three things have to come together to make consumer use of QR codes truly worthwhile as a mainstream communication medium.

Content is the easy one for marketers to take care of – offer something that makes it worthwhile for a consumer to interact especially when it’s still not easy to do so.

Maybe 2012 will be the year when those three things do come together.

Embedded Link

Why Marketer Love for QR Codes Is Not Shared by Consumers | Digital – Advertising Age
Quick-response codes are everywhere these days. But consumers are not nearly as excited about QR codes as marketers are.

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Post imported by Google+Blog. Created By Daniel Treadwell.

(Image at top by Fabrice de Nola, used under Creative Commons license.)

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Tesco connects busy shoppers with QR codes

qr2tescovideoOne of the critiques of QR codes I often hear is about the lack of imaginative uses being made of them.  Surely you can do better than simply get a company’s regular website – too often not optimized for mobile use – or search engine results when you scan the code on your mobile device.

Actually, I think there are plenty of imaginative uses being made of these square data-rich barcodes that provide the consumer and code-creator alike with a valuable experience. Here’s one more – what UK retailer Tesco is doing in South Korea that offers consumers an experience that matches their lifestyles and shows how Tesco (operating as Homeplus in South Korea in a joint venture with Samsung) understands their local market.

Take a look at this video that shows how the company has created "QR code shopping experiences" in the subway stations in the South Korean capital, Seoul. As the video narrator notes, South Koreans hate shopping – too busy, no time – so the retailer gives them a means to do it that’s in line with how people in one of the world’s most mobile-connected countries like to do things.

(If you don’t see the video embedded here, watch it on YouTube. If you want to view it on your mobile device, scan the QR code at the top of this page.)

What commuter-shoppers do is view the photos of products in the virtual store, scan a product’s QR code with their mobile device to add it to their virtual cart, and get it delivered to their physical address. It’s also a brilliant idea for spontaneous shopping – a good use of your precious time while you’re waiting for your train even if you hadn’t planned to do any shopping.

Tesco say that this campaign has been a success with metrics that speak for themselves – the video shows that new sign-ups for online shopping increased by 76 percent with actual sales up by 130 percent.

tescoqrkoreametrics

Surely an idea that can travel!

[Later] I was curious to learn who was behind this campaign. The answer is Cheil Worldwide, a marketing and communications company headquartered in Seoul. The video above was part of the firm’s entry in this year’s Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity that takes place this week, ending tomorrow the 25th.

Cheil Worldwide won a Gold Lion. Well deserved.

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