Making the #CIPRSM redundant

#CIPRSM

One of the great things about a professional association is that it can be a powerful force for change in taking a leading and proactive stand in helping those in the profession – association members or not – understand and more likely embrace the change if that’s a goal.

I see that as a great position the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) is now in with regard to social media and where it fits into the broader organisational communication landscape.

Social media has been at the forefront of the CIPR’s professional development agenda for some years, especially since the formation of the Social Media Panel (#CIPRSM) in 2010.

The Panel brought structure, focus and strong and effective advocacy and leadership to a topic that was becoming increasingly important to CIPR members and, indeed, to the CIPR itself. Not only that, it has been a driving force behind the creation of best practice guidelines on how to engage with Wikipedia, and the publication  of two books about social media and PR (Share This and Share This Too) among other achievements.

Today, the CIPR announced new leadership for the Social Media Panel in 2014 and a significant shift in strategic focus over the next two years “that will change the remit of the panel under the leadership of new Co-Chairs” with Gem Griffiths and Dan Tyte taking over from current Chair Stephen Waddington as those Co-Chairs.

The shift in focus is most interesting. In Gem Griffith’s words:

Our ambition is to make #CIPRSM redundant within two years by integrating digital and social media into all aspects of training, education and policy at the CIPR.

We’ll know we’ve done a good job when the panel stops advising solely on social media sites and digital platforms and shifts its focus to discussing and advising on innovative trends – social, technical or otherwise – that will impact and shape the future of the public relations profession.

The timing couldn’t be better to firmly and confidently take social media to the next level in the PR context and en route to that shift in focus Gem mentions aimed at shaping the future of the public relations profession.

Read the CIPR’s full announcement for details: CIPR Social Media Panel sets out ambitious strategy for 2014 under new leadership.

New guide to better understanding social media from the CIPR

Here to helpUnderstanding the social media landscape can be trickier than it might seem.

In the context of how and where social media fits into traditional marketing and communication activity – what it can deliver, how you benchmark it, how you measure the return on your investment, how to understand and assess the risks of using it – it’s sometimes a bigger picture than many people realize.

Today, awareness of and understanding about social media and what it can deliver in a business context is generally high, although I believe too many people lack clear understanding about ‘engagement,’ confusing it with ‘marketing’ (and even ‘selling’).

There’s no end of information, guides and people willing to sell you how-to? advice, training, solutions, what have you. How do you choose a trusted source?

In the area of guides, one proven trusted source is the CIPR, the UK’s professional association for public relations practitioners. They’ve just published an updated edition of their best practice guide on managing social media campaigns.

The Social Media Best Practice Guide addresses and explains the following topics:

  • Definition of social media
  • Dos and don’ts of social media
  • Planning social media
  • Legal considerations
  • Security considerations
  • Advice for employers
  • Social media measurement

The guide includes a credible definition of the term ‘social media’:

Social media is the term commonly given to Internet and mobile-based channels and tools that allow users to interact with each other and share opinions and content. As the name implies, social media involves the building of communities or networks and encouraging participation and engagement.

The 28-page guide is well written and credible in how it approaches each of the topics and explains, in simple terms, what each one means. While its focus is clearly on public relations, it’s a useful publication for anyone in business looking for better understanding about social media.

Take a look. Then download your copy of the PDF – it’s free.

(If you don’t see the document above, see it at Slideshare.)

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FIR Interview: Adam Parker, RealWire, on the roles of listening and influence

Define "influence"...

In today’s professional development landscape, a major educational imperative for PR practitioners, marketers and others involved in online engagement is knowing how to find influential voices across the social web: what to look for, where to focus your attention, what tools are there to help you, and where do you start.

One man who has the credentials to share insights on such questions is Adam Parker, chief executive of RealWire, the UK media intelligence company, and the founder and architect of Lissted, its new superhuman social listening tool.

In this FIR Interview conducted at the CIPR’s PR Show 2013 in London on November 26, 2013, FIR co-host Neville Hobson met up with Adam during one of the breaks between conference sessions in the vibrant and very noisy atrium at the Business Design Centre in London for a chat over coffee. We began our conversation with Adam setting the scene with some perspectives on social media monitoring.

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About our Conversation Partner

Adam ParkerAdam Parker is chief executive of RealWire, the UK media intelligence company, and the founder and architect of Lissted, its new superhuman social listening tool.

He is a member of the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR), a regular speaker on best practice in online PR and one of the co-authors of the CIPR’s bestselling “Share This” series of books, contributing the chapter “Media Relations Modernised” to the first book, and a chapter on the topic of “Understanding Social Capital” to its sequel.

Adam is also a chartered accountant, and before joining RealWire spent nine years with PwC in its audit, corporate finance and consulting practices working with both public and private sector blue chip organizations.

Connect with Adam on Twitter: @AdParker.

FIR Community on Google+Share your comments or questions about this podcast, or suggestions for future podcasts, in the online FIR Podcast Community on Google+.

You can also send us instant voicemail via SpeakPipe, right from the FIR website. Or, call the Comment Line at +1 415 895 2971 (North America), +44 20 3239 9082 (Europe), or Skype: fircomments. You can tweet us: @FIRpodcast. And you can email us at fircomments@gmail.com. If you wish, you can email your comments, questions and suggestions as MP3 file attachments (max. 3 minutes / 5Mb attachment, please!). We’ll be happy to see how we can include your audio contribution in a show.

To receive all For Immediate Release podcasts including the weekly Hobson & Holtz Report, subscribe to the full RSS feed.

This FIR Interview is brought to you with Lawrence Ragan Communications, serving communicators worldwide for 35 years. Information: www.ragan.com.

Podsafe music – On A Podcast Instrumental Mix (MP3, 5Mb) by Cruisebox.

(Cross-posted from For Immediate Release, Shel’s and my podcast blog.)

FIR Speakers and Speeches: Robert Scoble and Shel Israel in London on ‘Age of Context’ #AoCUK #CIPR

[L-R] Shel Israel and Robert Scoble in London, Oct 28, 2013

Five converging forces – mobile, social media, data, sensors and location – are reshaping our lives and will have profound effects on each of us individually, in the workplace and in our society at large during the coming decade.

This central premise was at the heart of a compelling discussion that took place at Google Campus in London on October 28, 2013.

The event – organized by the CIPR and sponsored by Precise – brought Shel Israel and Robert Scoble to the stage. In a lively 75-minute conversation moderated by FIR co-host Neville Hobson, the two authors of the highly-rated book, Age of Context, shared their insights and opinions with an audience of about 100 public relations practitioners and others, many of whom came armed with their own questions and opinions.

In the book’s foreword, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff tells us to “be prepared to see the future in these pages.” Both authors helped everyone in the room see precisely that.

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(Video recording: The event was also video recorded by the CIPR. Check the CIPR’s CIPRtv YouTube channel for information.)

About the Speakers

Robert ScobleRobert Scoble is an American blogger, technical evangelist, and author. As a startup liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, he travels the world looking for what’s happening on the bleeding edge of technology.

Robert has interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators, and reports for Building 43 and in social media.

He is the co-author, with Forbes columnist Shel Israel, of Age of Context. Their previous book, Naked Conversations: How Blogs are Changing the Way Businesses Talk with Customers, published in 2006, has been called a watershed work in introducing business to social media.

Shel IsraelShel Israel helps businesses tell their stories in engaging ways, as a writer, consultant and presentation coach.

He is the author and co-author of five books including Age of Context – his latest book, co-written with Robert Scoble and released in September 2013 – Naked Conversations and Twitterville.

Shel currently writes the Contextual Beat column for Forbes.com. Previously he has contributed to BusinessWeek, Dow Jones, Fast Company and American Express Open Forum.

FIR Community on Google+Share your comments or questions about this podcast, or suggestions for future podcasts, in the online FIR Podcast Community on Google+.

You can also send us instant voicemail via SpeakPipe, right from the FIR website. Or, call the Comment Line at +1 415 895 2971 (North America), +44 20 3239 9082 (Europe), or Skype: fircomments. You can tweet us: @FIRpodcast. And you can email us at fircomments@gmail.com. If you wish, you can email your comments, questions and suggestions as MP3 file attachments (max. 3 minutes / 5Mb attachment, please!). We’ll be happy to see how we can include your audio contribution in a show.

To receive all For Immediate Release podcasts including the weekly Hobson and Holtz Report, subscribe to the full RSS feed.

This FIR Speakers and Speeches podcast is brought to you with Lawrence Ragan Communications, serving communicators worldwide for 35 years. Information: www.ragan.com.

Picture at top by Bob Barker. Music clip from Accelerated Ideas and used with permission.

(Cross-posted from For Immediate Release, Shel’s and my podcast blog.)

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Scoble and Israel join up the dots #AoCUK #CIPR

[L to R] Neville Hobson-Shel Israel-Robert Scoble

About 100 people gathered in Google’s London campus last night to hear Robert Scoble and Shel Israel talk about concepts, ideas, experiences, trends and realities surrounding some of the themes and topics in their new book, Age of Context, published in September.

The widely-anticipated event was organized by the CIPR and sponsored by Precise.

Age of Context is the embracing term to anchor five converging forces the two authors see as profoundly changing almost every aspect of work and life in the next decade: mobile, social media, data, sensors and location.

Copies of the book were to be given to every event attendee. But, as Shel explained as the discussion got underway, the packages being delivered by DHL never made it in time for last night’s event, inevitably linking DHL to the hashtag #DHLfail.

Once the books do turn up, the CIPR will arrange for copies to get to everyone who bought a ticket to last night’s event.

My role as discussion facilitator was to keep the conversation going, moving it across the spectrum of topics the book addresses. If I’d had any concerns about continuity and flow, they were unwarranted as both Shel and Robert are articulate conversationalists on topics that both have clear, strong and passionate views about.

The conversation was wide ranging and did what I see as the book’s crowning achievement – helped join up the dots of disparate-looking and seemingly-individual technologies and human behaviours that enable you the reader to see and better understand how and why convergence of the five forces the book addresses is already happening, what it will mean to each of us as individuals and to society at large.

In the book’s foreword, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff tells us to “be prepared to see the future in these pages.” Both authors helped everyone in the room see more than just simple glimpses of that future.

Which led to a good discussion on a topic that rears its head ever more these days – privacy, discussed at length in the book itself.

As you’d expect at any event worth its salt, a great deal of commentary and opinion about what people thought and were experiencing was shared on Twitter linked to the hashtag #AoCUK. Gabrielle Laine-Peters has done a great job capturing much of those conversation contributions – tweets and photos – in a terrific Storify curation.

The full one-hour discussion was video- and audio-recorded. The video will be published by the CIPR; the audio will be published as an FIR Speakers & Speeches podcast. Both should be available sometime next week – keep an eye on the #AoCUK hashtag for news.

In all, a terrific event, well organized and managed by the CIPR. Thanks to Shel Israel and Robert Scoble for sharing their insights and giving us opportunities for seeing more clearly what’s happening, what’s coming and what we can do about it as communicators.

And thanks to everyone in the audience last night who asked questions, tweeted their opinions and became integral parts of the conversation.

Talk about converging forces!

(Montage of photos at the top of this page courtesy of Thomas Power.)

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The Age of Context comes to London in October

Age of ContextIf you’re a follower of trends in technologies and people’s behaviours – and that mashup between the two – an event in London next month will be of interest to you.

On October 28, Robert Scoble and Shel Israel will be in London as guests of the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) and their partner Precise to talk about the Age of Context – the title of their new book, out in November.

Age of Context is an embracing term to anchor five converging forces the two authors see as profoundly changing almost every aspect of work and life in the next decade: mobile, social media, data, sensors and location.

Age of Context is a follow-up to Naked Conversations that the two authors wrote in 2006. That book examined the then-emerging field of blogs and blogging and its disruptive effects on how businesses should communicate and engage with customers. (I reviewed it in Feb 2006.)

Naked Conversations is widely regarded as a seminal work that influenced opinion and corporate behaviours in many organizations in how people in those organizations communicate with customers and other stakeholders.

Seven years on and the landscape is very different and a more complex one than that described in 2006.

Where ‘blogging’ was ‘social media’ back then, today the latter term embraces a wide and deep spectrum of tools, networks, channels and behaviours across a huge social web that connects well over a quarter of the world’s population.

I’m thrilled to have been asked by the CIPR to facilitate the conversation, as it were, with Robert and Shel at the evening event in London on October 28 that takes place at Google’s new Campus London facility in the heart of Tech City in east London.

I’m sure this event will sell out fast – just look at how fast the official US book launch event in California on November 7 has sold out – so I suggest you get your London tickets now!

Register at Eventbrite

Everyone who comes will receive a free copy of Age of Context. And, the discussion with and between Robert and Shel and the audience (and those connected online via Twitter and other social media) will be recorded and published as a For Immediate Release Speakers and Speeches podcast.

Hope to see you there!

More information in the CIPR’s press release, issued today.

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