Valuable insights in 2014 #InternetTrends report by Mary Meeker

netflix-chromecast.jpg

Last week, US venture capitalist and former Wall Street securities analyst Mary Meeker published her 2014 Internet Trends report that offers a deep-dive look into the trends, possibilities, probabilities, scope and scale of what the global connected world will look like in the coming few years.

It highlights trends to pay attention to, offering keen insights into what’s shaping this connected world:

  1. Key internet trends showing slowing internet user growth but strong smartphone, tablet and mobile data traffic growth as well as rapid growth in mobile advertising.
  2. Emerging positive efficiency trends in education and healthcare.
  3. High-level trends in messaging, communications, apps and services.
  4. Data behind the rapid growth in sensors, uploadable / findable / shareable data, data mining tools and pattern recognition.
  5. Context on the evolution of online video.
  6. Observations about online innovation in China.

At 164 pages, the slide deck is huge in its scope, and a challenge to decipher detailed meaning from just a deck without the benefit of hearing its creator talk you through it (she did that at the event last week for which she had prepared the deck).

Many others are filling the vacuum to do that. I have some thoughts, too, on a few areas from the 164 slides. I expand on that below, but if you want to just feast on all of Meeker’s data right now, here’s the deck:

Last year’s 2013 Internet Trends report was 117 pages, a slim volume by comparison. Indeed, I found it it a relatively simple matter to quickly glean and absorb insights from her deck to come up with what I saw in May 2013 as fifteen big trends for the evolving digital age.

A year later, how does the landscape look?

Here are three elements from the 2014 report that caught my attention (and imagination).

1. The rise of the mobile internet and the mobile devices that people want to use on the web are irresistible

The first aspect is the steady increase in shipments of smartphones (Wikipedia definition) worldwide since 2009 …

mm2014slide06

…  and, in tandem, the rocketing growth in tablet (Wikipedia definition) shipments which overtook shipments of desktop and notebook PCs at the end of 2012/beginning of 2013.

And notice the massive uptick in tablet shipments that started at the end of the first quarter in 2013 …

mm2014slide07

… which makes it easy to understand in the context of the increasing numbers of people accessing content on the web via mobile devices like smartphones and tablets in May 2014 compared to the same time in 2013. While there isn’t a slide to show how connectivity – whether wired, wireless or cellular – is growing everywhere, these figures surely provide convincing evidence that that is what’s happening.

And global mobile usage average has almost doubled year on year, broadly reflecting the detail in each of the regions measured.

mm2014slide09

What these metrics say to me is this: if your presence on the web isn’t attuned to mobile – meaning, your site delivers the content people want and a great experience they expect when they come to you on their mobile devices – you’re in serious trouble.

2. The evolution of mobile apps

If using the web on a mobile device is increasing at a rapid pace as smartphones and tablets eclipse desktops and laptops, the requirement for mobile tools – apps – to let you do what you want on your mobile connected device is equally increasing at a rapid pace …

mm2014slide40

… where those apps are evolving into tools of genuine utility for the user, that let you do certain things very well.

So instead of being all things to all men, so to speak, many apps are shifting into specific use formats …

mm2014slide41

… that offer you context-aware interactions that, as TechCrunch notes, are purpose-built and informed by contextual signals like hardware sensors to interact with you in far more compelling ways than at present to maximize their usefulness to you.

3. Game changers for mobile TV and video consumption

Meeker’s slide deck has a great deal of content about the rise of personalized television where you the user define what the content is that you will watch and where you get it from (think of custom user preferencing in Netflix and Chromecast, as examples of this), and how you control it.

Consumers increasingly expect to watch TV content on their own terms.

I have a good example: watching a film that’s delivered from Netflix where I control its output with my smartphone or tablet to play on my digital smart television via wifi connection to the Chromecast dongle plugged in to the HDMI port on the TV. No traditional TV broadcaster in this transmission/consumption equation at all.

mm2014slide124

For me, this text slide summarizes very well the key aspects of all this, the “televisual game changers.”

mm2014slide126

And so, a small subset of the compelling content in Mary Meeker’s 164 pages of metrics and insights that make up her Internet Trends 2014 report. My focus has very much been on mobile. That’s by accident and by design – I didn’t plan this post to be like that, yet all the things that grabbed my attention that I’ve written about here are all to do with mobile.

Well, maybe not everything. Big data trends, for instance.

mm2014slide60

Do review the full deck and see what strikes you as compelling. And some of the other reporting on it is pretty good, adding to the ways in understanding what the report is about:

Download the PDF report here: 2014 Internet Trends By Mary Meeker or view the deck on Slideshare.

It’s still about connecting people

The Web 2.0 song

A serendipitous moment last evening on Twitter when Charlotte Beckett tweeted “Do you remember that great video explaining Web 2.0?”

I knew immediately what video she was asking about as I’d referenced it recently in a client presentation – it was “the Web 2.0 song” created by Nokia in 2007 when the term “Web 2.0” was at the height of widespread use as an effective method of explaining the rapidly-evolving online landscape of connected services that enabled people to talk and share things in new and interesting ways.

It was a landscape that was nowhere near mainstream. It was still the time of early adopters and experimenters.

How different we are today when everything to be known about the social tools and channels that form a big part of what we now call “social media” seems to be known by everyone (which is not the same thing as knowing how to be really effective in using them).

So for old times’ sake, here is that video from Nokia, “the Web 2.0 song“:


La chanson du web 2.0 par NOKIA by buzzynote

Tools and channels may change but one thing is constant – it’s still about connecting people.

How up-to-speed are you about mobile?

If you use social web services like Instagram, Vine or Snapchat, you’re probably aware that these particular services are very much designed for use on mobile devices. By 98 percent, 99 percent and 100 percent of users, respectively, to be precise.

How clear are you on other popular services? Twitter, for instance? Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr or LinkedIn? What’s the primary way in which people use those?

A handy chart by Statista offers some clarity.

Mobile first

86 percent of Twitter users are mobile-first in their use of the platform. I’d say one reason the percentage isn’t higher still is because many people (like me, for instance) use the service on multiple platforms depending on where they are, what they’re doing and what device they happen to be using. The “Twitter experience” is pretty good across all devices.

In contrast, LinkedIn is still largely a fixed-location-first type of usage, with only 26 percent on mobile. Maybe that reflects its user demographic (business people) as well as its less-than-stellar experience via mobile devices.

This snapshot view from December 2013 illustrating how most social networks are now mobile-first in their usage is yet another pointer to the bigger picture on what’s happening across the online world. It’s a picture of the US but it is a credible indicator of much of the global online world.

That’s borne out in a detailed sharing of metrics from Forrester Research in 2014 Mobile Trends, a 43-slide deck posted on Slideshare in February that offers credible perspectives in three key areas:

  1. How will mobile transform business?
  2. What will happen in 2014?
  3. What won’t happen in 2014?

The “What will happen…” section includes a really interesting prediction:

  • New mobile-centric ad formats will emerge
  • More mobile ad network will shift to the exchanges
  • Short videos (5 to 10 seconds) will make a greater impact on consumers, taking advantage of higher engagement levels with video on mobile

Look at that Statista chart, above, again.

In the “What won’t happen…” section, Forrester says wearable technology won’t move past a niche market: it’s still experiment time. (I’m looking forward to seeing what the 2014 hype cycle on emerging technologies from Gartner, due within the next month or so, shows about wearable tech.)

2014 Mobile Trends from Forrester Research

Insights worth understanding.

(Statista chart via Paul Fabretti)

The big idea from Sprinklr

Social ad spending trends to 2015 - eMarketer

Less than three months after its acquisition of social business pioneer Dachis Group, social media SaaS vendor Sprinklr launches the next stage in its drive to bring greater integrated ‘social at scale’ ability to large enterprises with the introduction of paid social media to its modular infrastructure software platform.

In its announcement today, Sprinklr says the new paid-media capability tightly connects the platform that Forrester Research described as “the most powerful technology on the market” to the $7.8 billion market for paid social advertising.

This new capability enables brands and their agencies to plan, execute, measure and optimize their paid activities on Facebook and Twitter in the same environment as their owned and earned engagement. Combining integrated brand analytics (added via Sprinklr’s recent acquisition of Dachis Group), integrated listening (launched in January 2014), and automation to optimize paid media spend is a breakthrough for brand and direct response marketers. Early clients have reported over 25% increase in ROI as a result of increased effectiveness and efficiency.

In tandem with its enhanced-solution announcement, Sprinklr said it has raised $40 million in Series D funding from Iconiq Capital, Battery Ventures and Intel Capital. Sprinklr says the capital injection will enable the firm to attain a projected growth target of 300 percent year over year.

“Sprinklr has a bold vision for integrated experience management for the enterprise,” said Carey Lai of Intel Capital. “$100 billion of deployed enterprise software is at risk of becoming obsolete because of fundamental changes in consumer behavior and Sprinklr has the capability to capitalize. This is a big idea whose time has come.”

For the full story, read today’s press release – here’s the text:

Sprinklr Launches Paid Social Media Solution and Announces $40M Series D Funding Led by Iconiq Capital

Funding fuels the growth of industry’s first social relationship management infrastructure with integrated owned, earned, and paid capabilities

New York, NY — April 22, 2014 – Sprinklr, the largest independent enterprise social relationship platform provider, today announced the launch of its integrated paid social media capability as well as a $40 million Series D investment from Iconiq Capital, Battery Ventures, and Intel Capital. This new round of funding fuels Sprinklr’s projected growth of 300% year over year, as it enables end-to-end social experience management for large enterprises.

Sprinklr’s launch of paid media tightly connects the platform that Forrester Research named “The most powerful technology on the market,” to the $7.8 billion market for social paid advertising. This new capability enables brands and their agencies to plan, execute, measure and optimize their paid activities on Facebook and Twitter in the same environment as their owned and earned engagement. Combining integrated brand analytics (added via Sprinklr’s recent acquisition of Dachis Group), integrated listening (launched in January 2014), and automation to optimize paid media spend is a breakthrough for brand and direct response marketers. Early clients have reported over 25% increase in ROI as a result of increased effectiveness and efficiency. The module is expected to be generally available to all clients in six weeks.

“The social age demands that brands manage experiences across every touchpoint – every team, department, division and location. Paid media is at the core and is the most expensive part of creating brand experiences” said Ragy Thomas, CEO of Sprinklr. “The launch of paid and a 40MM series D, led by the smartest source of money on the planet, sets Sprinklr up to continue on our tremendous growth path.”

Iconiq Capital, a global multi-family wealth management company, led the round with participation from existing investors Battery Ventures and Intel Capital.

“Very few companies have ever been on Sprinklr’s current trajectory,” said Neeraj Agrawal of Battery Ventures. “The introduction of an integrated paid media module ahead of schedule positions Sprinklr as the go to provider to replace existing point solutions in social for large businesses tired of playing the role of a system integrator.”

“Sprinklr has a bold vision for integrated experience management for the enterprise,” said Carey Lai of Intel Capital. “$100 billion of deployed enterprise software is at risk of becoming obsolete because of fundamental changes in consumer behavior and Sprinklr has the capability to capitalize. This is a big idea whose time has come.”

Enterprises interested in learning more about this integrated capability can contact Sprinklr for a demonstration immediately. Existing clients can gain access to the integrated paid module by contacting their success manager.

Sprinklr is also hiring around the globe. Explore opportunities in Sprinklr’s New York, Austin, Delhi, Bangalore or Kiev offices here.

About Sprinklr

Sprinklr’s infrastructure software is how brands manage social experiences across every touchpoint. Unlike tools and platforms, Sprinklr is the only true integrated social relationship infrastructure. Called “The most powerful technology in the market” by Forrester Research, Sprinklr accelerates the social maturity of a brand, from just ‘doing social’ to being social, at scale. Sprinklr’s cloud software and strategic and analytic services enable the enterprise to innovate faster, grow revenue, manage risk and reduce operational costs. Founded in 2009, Sprinklr is headquartered in New York City and serves more than 450 brands worldwide including Microsoft, Intel, Virgin America, IHG, and 4 of the top 5 US banks. Visit www.sprinklr.com @sprinklr #SocialAtScale.

Don’t let your #heartbleed over web security

HeartbleedOne word that’s been all over the web this past week is ‘Heartbleed.”

Together with a highly-visible image, it has been the focus of much commentary and opinion, some of it contradictory, some of it confusing.

Heartbleed is a major security vulnerability on the internet, one that I’ve seen described as “11 on a a scale of 1 to 10” where 10 equals ‘catastrophe.’

All of the focus has led to widespread public awareness on an international level of what Heartbleed is,  and why people need to give it their attention. What is hasn’t yet done is lead to widespread public understanding on what is a sensible course of action that individuals and organizations can take to address it.

Some people say you should change all your online passwords to ensure that your access to websites you use that require passwords isn’t compromised. Others disagree.

Heartbleed in RSS feed

With so much FUD out there – you should see the quantity of varied content about Heartbleed in my RSS reader – it’s hard to know in lay terms what you should actually do that will give you confidence that you’ve done the right thing.

Well, there are some simple and rapid first steps you can take.

Regarding places online that you use and that are essential services from your point of view – that might include social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn; and services like online banking, email and shopping – your first step should be to check with the services concerned to see what they say about Heartbleed.

For instance, LinkedIn – when I visited the website in recent days, I saw a prominent message in a top-of-screen banner that says, in essence, that LinkedIn hasn’t been affected at all by Heartbleed.

LinkedIn Heartbleed banner

I didn’t see any such message in accessing LinkedIn via its Android app, though.

I was reassured to see a clear message about Heartbleed from Lloyds Bank when I logged in to the online banking site on Saturday, saying “we would like to reassure our customers that our online banking systems are not exposed to this vulnerability.”

Lloyds Bank Heartbleed message

That’s precisely the kind of message you want to look for from any service you use online. And proactively so – just like LinkedIn and Lloyds Bank – rather than not knowing and having to ask.

If you use the Google Chrome browser on a Windows computer, you can install the Chromebleed Checker extension that runs in the background checking every website you visit. It displays a warning if a site you’re visiting might be affected by the Heartbleed bug.

Chromebleed Checker alert

Quite disconcerting when an alert does pop up! But it offers no information on what to do or where to get more details or help. Note the “could be vulnerable…” text. And see the mixed reviews.

Still, it may serve a good purpose in bringing the broad issue of security to the closer attention of website users and owners.

As for changing passwords, I think you need to be a bit circumspect. It seems to me that there’s little point in doing a wholesale change-every-password activity unless:

  • you know or feel concerned that you can no longer trust a particular online place,
  • you know for sure that it’s compromised and therefore not safe, or
  • a particular site has told you to change your password.

And consider this – there is no point in changing your password for a site you think might be affected by Heartbleed but you don’t really know for sure as your new password will be just as much at risk as the old one if the site actually is vulnerable but hasn’t fixed the vulnerability yet.

A good start would be listing every service you use online that’s important to you, asking those services about Heartbleed (and searching online for what’s being said about that service in this context), and then making a decision about passwords.

Mashable published a useful list of many social networks and other companies’ sites with information that helped Mashable recommend whether to change your password or not.

mashablelistheartbleed

Mashable’s recommendation for most of the social networks in the list is “change your password!”

Those sites are Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr. Keep an eye on the sites of the services you use to look for news about patches or fixes, as well as their Twitter handles and other social places they also use. And email.

But there’s more.

CNN reports that Heartbleed doesn’t just affect websites, it also has shown up in the devices we use to connect to the internet.

[...] Tech giants Cisco and Juniper have identified about two dozen networking devices affected by Heartbleed, including servers, routers, switches, phones and video cameras used by small and large businesses everywhere. The companies are also reviewing dozens more devices to determine whether they’re impacted by the bug as well.

ZDNet reports that iOS and OS X  – Apple’s operating systems for its mobile devices and computers respectively – don’t have the Heartbleed bug but Blackberry’s BBM for iOS and Android do.

[...] BlackBerry has now confirmed that several of its products, including BBM for iOS and Android were affected by the Heartbleed. BBM has about 80 million users. Other BlackBerry products affected include its rival to Samsung’s Knox, Secure Work Space for iOS and Android, and BlackBerry Link for Windows and Mac OS.

BlackBerry doesn’t have a patch for any of the products yet, but worse yet there are “no mitigations” for the vulnerability in BBM or Secure Work Spaces.

According to ZDNet, Google said that Android 4.1.1, Jelly Bean, was affected by the bug and it was developing a patch and distributing it to Android partners. 

A complex and alarming landscape we find ourselves navigating today with a huge amount of information swirling out there but not enough clarity yet.

Don’t be caught out through not taking some common-sense steps to protect your information (and identity). Make sure you install any software updates or patches for your mobile devices as they become available.

Above all, make sure you have strong and unique passwords for all the important-to-you places you use. Yes, it’s a pain to have to make separate and unique hard-to-remember passwords for every place you use rather than one or a few passwords, named after your cat or your first date, for everything.

Just say to yourself: “Prudence is a virtue.”

And while you’re at it, I strongly suggest you use two-factor authentication wherever it’s available (here’s why).

Additional reading about Heartbleed:

  • The Heartbleed Bug: “The Heartbleed Bug is a serious vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library. This weakness allows stealing the information protected, under normal conditions, by the SSL/TLS encryption used to secure the Internet. SSL/TLS provides communication security and privacy over the Internet for applications such as web, email, instant messaging (IM) and some virtual private networks (VPNs)…”
  • Here’s everything you need to know about the Heartbleed web security flaw by Mathew Ingram in GigaOm: “Researchers have discovered a serious flaw known as Heartbleed that affects the security software that runs on about two-thirds of the servers on the internet and could expose user data, including passwords…”
  • The Heartbleed Hit List: The Passwords You Need to Change Right Now by the Mashable Team: “An encryption flaw called the Heartbleed bug is already being called one of the biggest security threats the Internet has ever seen. The bug has affected many popular websites and services – ones you might use every day, like Gmail and Facebook – and could have quietly exposed your sensitive account information (such as passwords and credit card numbers) over the past two years…”
  • PR pros: Comms response to Heartbleed must be proactive and quick by PR Week US edition: “The Heartbleed computer bug that has left many websites vulnerable and open to data theft this week could affect more than Internet Web servers, according to security experts. Since the encryption flaw surfaced on [April 7], it has affected companies including Amazon.com, Google, and Yahoo…
  • Here’s why it took 2 years for anyone to notice the Heartbleed bug by Timothy B. Lee in Vox: “What caused the Heartbleed Bug that endangered the privacy of millions of web users this week? On one level, it looks like a simple case of human error. A software developer from Germany contributed code to the popular OpenSSL software that made a basic, but easy-to-overlook mistake. The OpenSSL developer who approved the change didn’t notice the issue either, and (if the NSA is telling the truth) neither did anyone else for more than 2 years…”

Igloo Software joins FIR as our latest sponsor

Igloo SoftwarePlease join us in welcoming Igloo Software as the latest FIR Podcast Network sponsor.

Igloo, which offers a web-based platform for collaborating at work, will join Ragan Communications and CustomScoop as sponsors of The Hobson and Holtz Report.

Through the Igloo platform, employees can share files, get (and share) answers, solve problems, locate information and expertise, and tap into the collective knowledge of the company’s customers, partners and peers, from wherever they are.

For up to 10 people, Igloo is free, with per-user pricing after that. Gamification, social analytics and other state-of-the-art elements are built into the platform, which can be customized to reflect your organization’s image. Companies using Igloo’s intranet software include Kimberly-Clark and International Data Corporation. The company is headquartered in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

Igloo intranet

As always, we strive to identify sponsors whose products and services are relevant to the FIR community. We’re confident we’ve achieved that goal with the addition of Igloo to The Hobson and Holtz Report. Please show them your support by checking out the site and seeing what they have to offer.

(Cross-posted from For Immediate Release, Shel’s and my podcast blog.)