#FutureComms14 has what you’re looking for

#FutureComms14

Just one day to go until #FutureComms14 takes place in London, on Wednesday June 18.

If you’re looking for answers to questions like:

  • Where is PR, communications and social media heading?
  • What does your brand need to do to adapt?
  • Content marketing versus the Big Idea?
  • Do brands need to think like media companies?
  • How can brands tell more compelling stories?
  • Which skills, technologies and platforms are critical for success?
  • How can we measure more smartly?

…then this one-day conference is the event for you.

“FutureComms14 brings together some of the world’s leading speakers and practitioners to inspire us to rise to the communications challenges of today and the near future,” declare Mynewsdesk, organisers of this event, who expect more than 200 people to be there.

To get a good sense of what you can expect on the day, check out this recording of a Google+ Hangout on Air panel discussion last month with some of the speakers – Deirdre Breakenridge, Danny Whatmough, Paul Sutton and me, Neville Hobson.

And check the tweetchat from last week. Fast and furious! Still time to get your ticket

Hashtag: #FutureComms14

Perspectives on social business at Social Business Sessions London

Iron ManIf you’re keen to explore different perspectives on organization culture, social business, enterprise 2.0 and the nature of work, an event in London I’m participating in this coming week could be right up your street.

The Combined Social Business Session – London #e20s takes place on Wednesday June 4 at Yammer’s EMEA headquarters, from 6pm to 9pm. You can participate without cost; all you have to do is sign up.

Organized by David Terrar, Janet Parkinson and Alan Patrick – who, I just realized,  I first met around eight years ago now – it’s one of the monthly Social Business Sessions London events at which a mix of a main 20-minute presentation, 5-minute lightning talks and an unconference-style panel discussion makes for a stimulating environment for informal exchanges of ideas and opinion, all with pizza and wine.

I was thrilled to be asked to do the main presentation in which I will focus on a mix of ideas that will form a broad perspective on those four elements mentioned above that are key to the principles of these events.

Or, as David put it in the email he sent out last week to members of the event group:

Our main speaker this time is our good friend and well known communicator, blogger, and podcaster Neville Hobson. Neville’s well known on the London social media scene, as well as being on Microsoft’s list of social business influencers in the UK. His talk will expand on a recent blog post of his titled “Foundations for evolving relationships between people and machines”. He’ll use Gartner’s Hype Cycle to discuss the following emerging trends and areas:

  1. Augmenting humans with technology
  2. Machines replacing humans
  3. Humans and machines working alongside each other
  4. Machines better understanding humans and the environment
  5. Humans better understanding machines
  6. Machines and humans becoming smarter

He’ll take those ideas forward and talk specifics like the Internet of Things, 3D Printing, Big Data and augmented reality, leading to the way they are changing the enterprise and the world of work.

Sounds good!

The blog post David referenced is this one that I wrote in August 2013. A lot has happened since then, especially concerning wearable technology and the relentless progress of mobile.

Hope you can make it to Yammer’s HQ in London on June 4. Sign up for your free ticket! And a 5-min lightning talk if you’re up for it.

How up-to-speed are you about mobile?

If you use social web services like Instagram, Vine or Snapchat, you’re probably aware that these particular services are very much designed for use on mobile devices. By 98 percent, 99 percent and 100 percent of users, respectively, to be precise.

How clear are you on other popular services? Twitter, for instance? Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr or LinkedIn? What’s the primary way in which people use those?

A handy chart by Statista offers some clarity.

Mobile first

86 percent of Twitter users are mobile-first in their use of the platform. I’d say one reason the percentage isn’t higher still is because many people (like me, for instance) use the service on multiple platforms depending on where they are, what they’re doing and what device they happen to be using. The “Twitter experience” is pretty good across all devices.

In contrast, LinkedIn is still largely a fixed-location-first type of usage, with only 26 percent on mobile. Maybe that reflects its user demographic (business people) as well as its less-than-stellar experience via mobile devices.

This snapshot view from December 2013 illustrating how most social networks are now mobile-first in their usage is yet another pointer to the bigger picture on what’s happening across the online world. It’s a picture of the US but it is a credible indicator of much of the global online world.

That’s borne out in a detailed sharing of metrics from Forrester Research in 2014 Mobile Trends, a 43-slide deck posted on Slideshare in February that offers credible perspectives in three key areas:

  1. How will mobile transform business?
  2. What will happen in 2014?
  3. What won’t happen in 2014?

The “What will happen…” section includes a really interesting prediction:

  • New mobile-centric ad formats will emerge
  • More mobile ad network will shift to the exchanges
  • Short videos (5 to 10 seconds) will make a greater impact on consumers, taking advantage of higher engagement levels with video on mobile

Look at that Statista chart, above, again.

In the “What won’t happen…” section, Forrester says wearable technology won’t move past a niche market: it’s still experiment time. (I’m looking forward to seeing what the 2014 hype cycle on emerging technologies from Gartner, due within the next month or so, shows about wearable tech.)

2014 Mobile Trends from Forrester Research

Insights worth understanding.

(Statista chart via Paul Fabretti)

The big idea from Sprinklr

Social ad spending trends to 2015 - eMarketer

Less than three months after its acquisition of social business pioneer Dachis Group, social media SaaS vendor Sprinklr launches the next stage in its drive to bring greater integrated ‘social at scale’ ability to large enterprises with the introduction of paid social media to its modular infrastructure software platform.

In its announcement today, Sprinklr says the new paid-media capability tightly connects the platform that Forrester Research described as “the most powerful technology on the market” to the $7.8 billion market for paid social advertising.

This new capability enables brands and their agencies to plan, execute, measure and optimize their paid activities on Facebook and Twitter in the same environment as their owned and earned engagement. Combining integrated brand analytics (added via Sprinklr’s recent acquisition of Dachis Group), integrated listening (launched in January 2014), and automation to optimize paid media spend is a breakthrough for brand and direct response marketers. Early clients have reported over 25% increase in ROI as a result of increased effectiveness and efficiency.

In tandem with its enhanced-solution announcement, Sprinklr said it has raised $40 million in Series D funding from Iconiq Capital, Battery Ventures and Intel Capital. Sprinklr says the capital injection will enable the firm to attain a projected growth target of 300 percent year over year.

“Sprinklr has a bold vision for integrated experience management for the enterprise,” said Carey Lai of Intel Capital. “$100 billion of deployed enterprise software is at risk of becoming obsolete because of fundamental changes in consumer behavior and Sprinklr has the capability to capitalize. This is a big idea whose time has come.”

For the full story, read today’s press release – here’s the text:

Sprinklr Launches Paid Social Media Solution and Announces $40M Series D Funding Led by Iconiq Capital

Funding fuels the growth of industry’s first social relationship management infrastructure with integrated owned, earned, and paid capabilities

New York, NY — April 22, 2014 – Sprinklr, the largest independent enterprise social relationship platform provider, today announced the launch of its integrated paid social media capability as well as a $40 million Series D investment from Iconiq Capital, Battery Ventures, and Intel Capital. This new round of funding fuels Sprinklr’s projected growth of 300% year over year, as it enables end-to-end social experience management for large enterprises.

Sprinklr’s launch of paid media tightly connects the platform that Forrester Research named “The most powerful technology on the market,” to the $7.8 billion market for social paid advertising. This new capability enables brands and their agencies to plan, execute, measure and optimize their paid activities on Facebook and Twitter in the same environment as their owned and earned engagement. Combining integrated brand analytics (added via Sprinklr’s recent acquisition of Dachis Group), integrated listening (launched in January 2014), and automation to optimize paid media spend is a breakthrough for brand and direct response marketers. Early clients have reported over 25% increase in ROI as a result of increased effectiveness and efficiency. The module is expected to be generally available to all clients in six weeks.

“The social age demands that brands manage experiences across every touchpoint – every team, department, division and location. Paid media is at the core and is the most expensive part of creating brand experiences” said Ragy Thomas, CEO of Sprinklr. “The launch of paid and a 40MM series D, led by the smartest source of money on the planet, sets Sprinklr up to continue on our tremendous growth path.”

Iconiq Capital, a global multi-family wealth management company, led the round with participation from existing investors Battery Ventures and Intel Capital.

“Very few companies have ever been on Sprinklr’s current trajectory,” said Neeraj Agrawal of Battery Ventures. “The introduction of an integrated paid media module ahead of schedule positions Sprinklr as the go to provider to replace existing point solutions in social for large businesses tired of playing the role of a system integrator.”

“Sprinklr has a bold vision for integrated experience management for the enterprise,” said Carey Lai of Intel Capital. “$100 billion of deployed enterprise software is at risk of becoming obsolete because of fundamental changes in consumer behavior and Sprinklr has the capability to capitalize. This is a big idea whose time has come.”

Enterprises interested in learning more about this integrated capability can contact Sprinklr for a demonstration immediately. Existing clients can gain access to the integrated paid module by contacting their success manager.

Sprinklr is also hiring around the globe. Explore opportunities in Sprinklr’s New York, Austin, Delhi, Bangalore or Kiev offices here.

About Sprinklr

Sprinklr’s infrastructure software is how brands manage social experiences across every touchpoint. Unlike tools and platforms, Sprinklr is the only true integrated social relationship infrastructure. Called “The most powerful technology in the market” by Forrester Research, Sprinklr accelerates the social maturity of a brand, from just ‘doing social’ to being social, at scale. Sprinklr’s cloud software and strategic and analytic services enable the enterprise to innovate faster, grow revenue, manage risk and reduce operational costs. Founded in 2009, Sprinklr is headquartered in New York City and serves more than 450 brands worldwide including Microsoft, Intel, Virgin America, IHG, and 4 of the top 5 US banks. Visit www.sprinklr.com @sprinklr #SocialAtScale.

New research shows what drives consumers in the collaborative economy

The world of sharing

If you want to know about the collaborative economy and what it may mean for businesses large and small, the man to pay close attention to is Jeremiah Owyang.

The collaborative economy – also variously referred to as the sharing economy, the maker movement, and co-innovation – is a concept that is gaining attention as a viable business method to be considered seriously.

In its simplest form, the collaborative economy is about a consumer using a good or service rather than owning it: you buy access to the good or service for the time when you need it. When you don’t, others make use of it.

Of course, there is far more to the collaborative economy than such a simplistic description, as Owyang makes clear in Sharing Is The New Buying, a new report published today that offers a wealth of credible perspectives on the rise of the collaborative economy in the US, Canada and the UK from 90,000 people questioned to find out how they partake in digital sharing services related to goods, services, transportation, space and money.

The report contains the following sections:

  • Introduction and Executive Summary
  • Breakdown of the three groups of sharing customers
  • Market adoption rates, forecast and growth rates
  • Taxonomy of the market
  • Breakdown by demographic: age, location, political party, marriage status and more
  • Satisfaction rates of sharing services
  • Forecast of future behaviours
  • Recommendations for corporations: market opportunities, and specific departmental impacts

An ex-Forrester and -Altimeter analyst, now founder of and Chief Catalyst at Crowd Companies, Owyang says his latest research has uncovered three distinct types of people who participate in the collaborative economy:

  1. Re-sharers: Those who buy and/or sell pre-owned goods online (for example, on Craigslist or eBay), but have not yet ventured into other kinds of sharing.
  2. Neo-sharers: People who use the newer generation of sharing sites and apps, like Etsy, TaskRabbit, Uber, Airbnb and KickStarter.
  3. Non-sharers: People who have yet to engage in the collaborative economy, although many of these non-sharers intend to try sharing services (in particular, re-sharing sites like eBay) in the next twelve months.

In a world where people can get what they need from each other, how can big brands survive and succeed?

Owyang believes that is the question every business should be asking as the collaborative economy becomes more established and is set to grow, as evidenced in the report.

Like social media before it, Owyang says, sharing will be rapidly adopted because the same technologies that make it easy to share also make it easy to spread the word about the benefits of sharing.

The Collaborative Economy at a glance

While the collaborative economy could disrupt many industries – and, says Owyang, is poised to do so – there is little data available on how many people participate in sharing, who they are, and, most importantly, why they do it.

This report – produced in collaboration with Vision Critical – fills a significant gap in knowledge leading to understanding, offering a picture of the sharers in the collaborative economy and provides important recommendations for businesses that want to win in this new economy.

Sharing Is the New Buying, a 31-page PDF, is available on free download: read it at Slideshare or in the embed below.

Remember the point of social business

What makes social business special...

There is some excellent thinking on display in a presentation deck on Slideshare that examines in some detail what large businesses could look like as the concepts and principles of social business evolve.

The deck is by Dion Hinchcliffe, Chief Strategy Officer at the Dachis Groupacquired last week by Sprinklr – that he used in a keynote presentation at the Enterprise 2.0 Summit in Paris earlier this month.

I explored what we’ve learned about social business and how we can use frameworks and heuristics to capture and communicate lessons learned.

The presentation starts with an overview of where social business is today five years on from the first appearance of the term; it continues with an examination of how companies are maturing their social business capabilities; looking at social business frameworks and the next-generation organization.

While it concludes with a plug for Social Business by Design, the 2012 management book by Hinchcliffe and Peter Kim, the deck contains a great deal of thought-provoking and compelling ideas that will give you plenty to consider as you look at your own organization and its structure in the context of social business.

For me, the most compelling slide of all is slide 41, the one you see at the top of this page – a clear reminder that ‘social’ is the key word in ‘social business.’

Review Hinchcliffe’s deck on Slideshare, or in the embed below, and see what you think:


Social Business: Frameworks for Next-Gen Organizational Structure | Enterprise 2.0 SUMMIT 2014 Keynote by Dion Hinchcliffe from Dion Hinchcliffe

If you’re not clear on what ‘social business’ is, by the way, listen to this interview I did with Andrew Grill of IBM last November who offers an explanation that makes sense.