A hangout on the future of communication

#FutureComms14

In just three weeks’ time, on June 18, FutureComms14 takes place in London.

This one-day conference, organized by MyNewsDesk UK, will firmly ask a big question: “What’s the future of communications?” The line up of speakers will offer some compelling answers to it that will undoubtedly include insights.

You really can’t ask for more from an event. I’ll be there, too, moderating a panel discussion on the technologies of PR and chipping in with a few perspectives as well in the context of that big question.

Yesterday, four of the speakers – Deirdre Breakenridge, Danny Whatmough, Paul Sutton and me, Neville Hobson – got together in a live Google+ Hangout On Air video panel discussion, ably moderated by Adam Cranfield, for a 50-minute conversation that addressed these topics:

  1. What is the future of communications?
  2. Will marketing, PR and social media job roles still be distinct in five years?
  3. Will the results that small agencies can achieve using communications technology make brands question the value for money large agencies offer?
  4. Will organizations rely more on in-house communicators to produce their content than external agencies?

It was a terrific discussion that attracted a number of live viewers and quite a few more to the recording on YouTube. And here’s the recording:

A taster of the what you can expect on June 18.

Check the hashtag #FutureComms14 for ongoing conversation. Connect with those on the FutureComms14 Twitter list created by Paul Sutton. And last but not least – book your ticket.

See you in London on June 18!

#Socialnomics 2014: A lot happened in five years

Hello 4 Cs of Digital...

A popular video in corporate presentations, seminars, webinars and other events aimed at educating business people about social media is Social Media Revolution, published in 2009 by author Erik Qualman to support his best-selling book, Socialnomics.

Since 2009, the video has been updated a few times to take into account how social media is evolving along with what people do with social media and how they use it. I’ve used them all myself, quite a lot, in business workshops and meetings.

I was reminded of the original video just this week when I heard the catchy Right Here, Right Now” soundtrack by Fatboy Slim during a marketing presentation at a company I was visiting. While the video is indeed a compelling audio-visual experience, the content isn’t wholly up-to-date any longer and misses quite a bit of what’s happening today. A lot has evolved and changed in five years.

If you are still using it, or any of the subsequent updates to it up to 2013, stop and get hold of the latest version, published this month. It’s called #Socialnomics 2014. (There’s a good indicator of changes over five years – the title itself is a hashtag now.)

#Socialnomics 2014 Video from Erik Qualman on Vimeo.

As with the previous versions, #Socialnomics 2014 has its own share of memorable metrics, like these that are pretty contemporary:

  • In ten years, 40 percent of the Fortune 500 will no longer be here.
  • More people own a mobile device than a toothbrush.
  • One in five divorces involves social media.
  • “What happens in Vegas stays in…” now reflects newer social channels such as Instagram, Pinterest, Weibo and Snapchat, to add to a steadily-growing list.
  • Each day, 20 percent of the terms typed into Google have never been searched before.
  • “Selfie” is  now a word in Webster’s dictionary.
  • Every second, two new members join LinkedIn.
  • Grandparents are the fastest-growing demographic on Twitter.
  • 53 percent of people on Twitter recommend products in their tweets.
  • 93 percent of shoppers’ buying decisions are influenced by social media.
  • 90 percent of consumers trust peer recommendations (only 14 percent trusts ads).
  • The average person has a seven-second attention span – that of the average goldfish is eight seconds.
  • Goodbye 4 Ps of marketing (product, place, price, promotion), and hello 4 Cs of digital (creating, curating, connecting, culture).

The focus of everything is American so bear that in mind in terms of how many of the metrics may or may not be credible when applied to different countries.

Still, it’s a highly useful and practical look at a constantly-evolving landscape where tools like this offer an entertaining way to get up to speed with what’s happening.

Incidentally, the soundtrack is Around the World by Daft Punk. As good as the Fatboy Slim one? You’ll have to watch and listen to decide.

Definitely worth your time.

If you attend one comms event this summer, make it #FutureComms14

FutureComms14

A really good conference for communicators takes place in London next month, and plans are well advanced for a day of valuable professional development, strongly focused on the question “What’s the future of communications?”and how to address it:

The disciplines of PR, marketing, social media and digital are converging and evolving at a breathless pace. Modern marketing communications is real-time, multimedia and multichannel. The challenge we face is to learn new skills, master new technologies, while maintaining focus on the key business goals of reputation and performance.

FutureComms14, organized by MyNewsDesk UK, takes place on Wednesday June 18 at The Crystal in London’s Docklands. The themes for the day that underpin the agenda are pretty compelling:

  • Where is PR, communications and social media heading?
  • What does your brand need to do to adapt?
  • Content marketing versus the Big Idea
  • Do brands need to think like media companies?
  • How can brands tell more compelling stories?
  • Which skills, technologies and platforms are critical for success?
  • How can we measure more smartly?

And the speakers who include three stand-outs for me:

  • Deirdre Breakenridge, who delivers the opening keynote on the future of communications (she expands her thinking on this topic in a post yesterday on the MyNewsDesk blog). The author of five business books, Deirdre is an influential voice in US communication circles, and a frequent speaker on PR, marketing, and social media communications. I’m really looking forward to meeting her next month.
  • Robert Phillips, ex-EMEA CEO of Edelman, and the author of “Trust Me, PR Is Dead,” a forthcoming book that’s already prompted some debate. Can’t wait to see Robert in action at this PR event!
  • Tom Foremski, ex-FT journalist and founder of Silicon Valley Watcher,  who famously (or infamously, depending on your point of view) proclaimed “Die, press release, die! Die! Die!” back in 2006 – could this futuristic call finally be answered eight years on? – and advocated in 2009 that every company is (or should be) a media company. Is that a viable call today?

Just three in an eclectic speaker roster that also features Daniel Dodd, Director of Communications and Content at the National Trust; Betony Kelly, Head of Digital Outreach for the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills; Danny Whatmough, Associate Digital and Social Media Director at Ketchum; Paul Sutton, Head of Social Communications at PR and content agency BOTTLE; Vikki Morgan, Head of Social at TMW agency; and many more. I’m also speaking (and working with MyNewsDesk on event development).

If I look at the conference and event landscape for communicators during the summer and into early autumn, FutureComms14 is the attention grabber. So if you’re looking for a good investment for your time and your money, this is the one.

Book your ticket early to be sure of a place. And if you book before May 18, there’s a discounted early bird rate.

Check the hashtag #FutureComms14 for the latest conversation. And connect with those on the FutureComms14 Twitter list created by Paul Sutton.

See you in London on June 18!

FIR Interview: Therese Manus and Stine Jarmund, Norwegian Communication Association

#komdagen selfieAttracting record attendance to an annual conference is no small feat, but is one achieved by The Norwegian Communication Association (NCA) which saw the highest number of its members take part in Communications Day, its annual conference in Oslo at the end of March.

What attracted 600 NCA members to take part in Communications Day 2014 is one of the topics discussed when FIR co-host Neville Hobson – who was an invited keynote speaker at the event – sat down with Therese Manus, managing director, and Stine Jarmund, training and events adviser, of the NCA to talk about the communication landscape in Norway.

The conversation addressed hot topics that concern communicators and professional associations everywhere – professionalism, for example, ongoing education and training, transparency and trust – that are issues that the NCA is also debating and discussing with its stakeholders in Norway, and on the broader international stage via its affiliation with the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management.

The final part of the discussion looked to the future of communication – the theme of this year’s Communication Day conference – and the profession, and what that might look like in Norway during the next five years.

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About our Conversation Partners

Therese ManusTherese Manus is the Managing Director of The Norwegian Communication Association. She has previously worked as Head of Section at the National Library of Norway, Communications Advisor at Energy Norway and Journalist and Editor at Budstikka Media.

Therese has a Master of Management module in PR Management and Strategic Communication from BI Norwegian Business School, a Bachelor’s degree in Media Studies from the University of Westminster, and has several subjects from the University of Oslo.

Stine JarmundStine Jarmund is an Advisor for training programs and conferences at The Norwegian Communication Association. Stine has previously worked as a Consultant for SHL Norway and as an Advisor for JCK Communication.

Stine has a Master’s degree in Social Sciences with a specialization in psychology from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and a Master of Management module in PR Management and Strategic Communication from BI Norwegian Business School.

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This FIR Interview is brought to you with Lawrence Ragan Communications, serving communicators worldwide for 35 years. Information: www.ragan.com.

Podsafe music – On A Podcast Instrumental Mix (MP3, 5Mb) by Cruisebox.

(Cross-posted from For Immediate Release, Shel’s and my podcast blog.)

Redefining today’s communicator in Norway

Communications Day 2014When I look at the landscape of the communication profession around Europe, I see similar issues that concern communicators, most notably how strategic are communicators (and the profession itself), abiding by codes of conduct and practicing ethical behaviour, and being professional.

It’s a topic in the front of my mind as I finalise plans for a keynote presentation to the members of the Norwegian Communications Association on March 27.

The devil’s in the detail, of course, and what’s hot in one country isn’t necessarily at the same temperature in another.

In the UK, for instance, a current strong focus is on professionalism following the findings published by the CIPR last month in its ‘state of the profession’ survey and a clear call to action by CIPR President Stephen Waddington who asked, “How serious are PR practitioners about putting their ambition to be considered a professional into practice?”

I do wonder at times how serious people really are: behaviours people say they want to emulate too often don’t match what I see people do.

Actually, I think this is a very hot issue everywhere even if many individuals may not realise it is. You only have to read the Edelman Trust Barometer 2014 – the results of a survey of 33,000 people in 27 countries – to get a sense of why it’s hot.

So while professional associations like the CIPR and the Norwegian Communications Association look at the big picture and ways to galvanize action among its members, I’m focused on what individuals can and must do to be professional, whatever their role in organizational communication and whatever their level in their organizations.

On March 27, I’ll be in Norway at Communications Day 2014 (or, rather, Kommunikasjonsdagen 2014 – hashtag #komdagen) to deliver a keynote presentation that I’ve titled “Redefining Today’s Communicator.”

From the description on the event website:

Today’s communicator must, as never before, have clear vision and understanding of how communication and the communicator are key strategic assets that support measurable business objectives. Today’s communicator has a key role to play in the rapidly-changing landscape that embraces organization change, behavioral change and technology change; and the online world where the three intersect.

In an age where anyone can claim to be a communicator in business, Neville Hobson will illustrate what professional communicators must do to prove their relevance and context in what they do for their employers and clients.

A pretty broad brush, but I intend to speak to that big topic of professionalism and present some ideas on what we all need to do. I want it to be a relevant piece of the jigsaw, the whole of which will be revealed by presentations from others on the day – Michael Murphy, for instance, talking about the challenges, disruptive influences and opportunities which are shaping the communications functions of the future; and Sigbjørn Aanes, State Secretary at the Prime Minister’s Office, talking about “communication, sausages and politics” (can’t wait to hear that one!).

The organizers tell me that over 520 communicators will be there on March 27 – a really great representation of the communication profession in Norway.

There’s still time and space to sign up if you haven’t yet. And right below is a bit more information – an ad that was published in a Norwegian magazine last month.

Looking forward to being part of your day!

 Kommunikasjonsdagen 2014

How serious are PRs about being genuinely professional?

So many embargoed press releases...

A simple, musing, rhetorical, tweet on Monday evening about PRs who send out press releases under embargo prompted a wide-ranging conversation on Twitter among a handful of people about professional behaviour, education and training, and being prepared for the PR workplace.

Sending out press releases under embargo isn’t an unusual practice. On the contrary, it can be a worthwhile activity for a PR professional, agency or client-side, when you want to enable journalists and others you believe can help tell your story be as prepared as possible and be ready to go live at an agreed future time.

What prompted my tweet was the sense of despair I feel all too often these days upon receiving press releases under embargo from PRs I don’t know or with whom I have no actual relationship.

And relationship is key, in my view. I’ve always regarded making any public announcement under embargo part of a process of trust-building, where both parties to an embargo have, beforehand, mutually agreed to respect the terms of it.

That requires some kind of prior personal connection, either physical or virtual, between two parties that is the building block for a relationship of some kind.

What I see nowadays, though, has nothing to do with relationship (nor, hence, trust-building or even respect) when I get press releases embargoed for days forward from people I don’t know and with whom I’ve not agreed any terms of any embargo.

They just send out the press releases anyway, usually mail-merged in bulk to distribution lists built from Vocus or Cision subscription databases – in spite of clear guidance from those two respected firms that you’re not supposed to do that – and with little or no thought to understanding whether the press release contains information that is at least relevant to the receiver.

Relevance is a highly significant aspect of this. The worst case is when I get an embargoed press release from a PR I don’t know, and it’s totally irrelevant to me.

Remember An Inconvenient PR Truth’s push against irrelevant press releases a few years ago? Go on, remind yourself.

An Inconvenient PR Truth from RealWire on Vimeo.

I’ve written about this topic a lot over the years, filed under the ‘Spam’ category.

So, to my near-rhetorical question: “Why should I respect embargoes?”

I do, actually, but in a passive sense – there’s no way I will write or say anything about a company or its product or service, embargo or no embargo, on information I get sent this way. Ever. I just delete the email and any attachments that come with it, and move on.

So musing on Twitter provoked some others to share their thoughts on the topic. Quite a few like minds, thank goodness, starting with Barbara Nixon and David Kamerer in the US:

And leading to a lengthy discussion involving Gabrielle Laine-Peters, Chris Owen and Paula Stei in the UK:

Gabrielle captured the scores of tweets into a Storify curation so please review that for the full conversation flow, or see the curation embedded at the end of this post.

There are three aspects from the conversation that have been rattling around my head since yesterday:

  1. The practice of sending out press releases under embargo as I’ve described here is anachronistic at best, unprofessional at worst, especially at a time when authenticity and relationships are two watchwords for creating the climate of trust that every PR professional surely ought to be striving to do (read the Edelman Trust Barometer 2014 to see why).
  2. That leads to focusing on the word ‘professional’ and how PRs clearly wish to be perceived as such by others, according to the latest ‘State of the Profession’ survey from the CIPR, published last week, saying, “Whilst nine out of ten respondents wish to be acknowledged as ‘professional’, results indicate a practice which seemingly struggles to embrace its desired professional ambitions.”
  3. To that end, CIPR President Stephen Waddington issued a challenge to CIPR members (one that every PR should pay heed to, CIPR member or otherwise): “How serious are you about putting this ambition [to be considered a professional] into practice?

It would be an easy matter to stay in exasperation mode and dismiss all of this as so much snow in Hell.

Even Stephen thinks it may take quite a while to see change.

Yet perhaps now, there’s a chance that some people in, or about to become part of, the public relations profession care enough that they themselves will be the architects of change.

Consider Paula Stei’s comments in the Twitter conversation yesterday. She’s a third-year PR student at university, who has a clear view on what feels right or not, and questions some behaviours. Maybe Paula and others in her generation can be the drivers of change. I’m certainly optimistic that I wouldn’t get an embargoed press release from Paula if we didn’t know each other.

From little acorns do mighty oak trees grow, as an old saying has it. The meaning is clear – great things may come from small beginnings. Behaviour change in how you do press releases is a good example of a small beginning that can lead to bigger things.

Maybe it’s changing a small thing such as this that can get you on the road to being perceived as a professional.

  • Related: In this week’s FIR podcast episode 744, my co-host Shel Holtz and I discuss the CIPR survey and Stephen Waddington’s challenge, looking at other options that professional associations may consider for the big-picture of professionalism, including attaining accreditation or passing an examination as a condition and requirement for a member to be able to practice public relations. That discussion starts about 16 minutes and 50 seconds into the show.

And for the Twitter conversation that prompted this post, here’s the Storify curation of tweets by Gabrielle Laine-Peters: