More possibilities with extended-time live video from Google+

Live Hangouts On Air

Wow – now you can do a Google Hangout On Air (a live video broadcast) for up to 8 hours!

That’s a huge amount of additional time from the previous 1-hour-maximum you had. And remember: up to 8 hours means just that – you don’t have to do 8 whole hours.

Oh what possibilities! Here are just 4:

  1. A live idea-a-thon to flesh out thinking and ideas for brand engagement via live participation with brand owners, customers and fans on the social web.
  2. Live segments over a set period with different people talking about different aspects of a topic.
  3. Live broadcast everything in a one-day conference or other event.
  4. Be very creative and experiment with your movie idea via “live TV over the web”.

Plus you get a recording of everything you do that gets published on your YouTube channel, and which you can edit.

How can you see opportunities?

Reshared post from +Tom Batkin

8 hours Rolled out!

You will see a Notification box above the start broadcast button in the green room

Hopefully you will not look as serious as I do in this selfie…..Note to self , smile next time

Big thanks to +Dawn R Nocera for letting me know where the notification was located

#hangouts   #hangoutsonair   #TheYearOfThePlus

cc +Ronnie Bincer ?

(Via Krishna De)

Know where the legal line lies in what you can and cannot say online

Attorney General's OfficeIf you need further evidence that social media is now very much part of the fabric of contemporary society, it comes in the form of an initiative by the Attorney General’s Office designed “to help prevent social media users from committing a contempt of court.”

Attorney General for England and Wales Dominic Grieve, QC, MP – the British government’s senior legal adviser – announced a change in government policy today about ‘not for publication’ advisories issued to the mainstream media designed to make sure that a fair trial takes place and warn people that comment on a particular case needs to comply with the Contempt of Court Act 1981.

[...] Blogs and social media sites like Twitter and Facebook mean that individuals can now reach thousands of people with a single tweet or post. This is an exciting prospect, but it can pose certain challenges to the criminal justice system.

In days gone by, it was only the mainstream media that had the opportunity to bring information relating to a court case to such a large group of people that it could put a court case at risk. That is no longer the case, and is why I have decided to publish the advisories that I have previously only issued to the media.

In other words, anyone with an internet connection can now read publicly what previously went privately only to a small group.

You’ll be able to read future advisories on the Attorney General’s Office website and via Twitter – just follow @AGO_UK.

In his announcement, the Attorney General added:

[...] I hope that by making this information available to the public at large, we can help stop people from inadvertently breaking the law, and make sure that cases are tried on the evidence, not what people have found online.

It’s a good initiative as raising awareness that leads to better understanding will provide people with the opportunity to act within the law and, thus, avoid themselves being in the dock.

It may surprise you (or not) that quite a number of people seem to believe that you can talk about anything online via social networks such as Twitter and Facebook with impunity. Say what you like, it seems to be: there is little consequence from a quick tweet or status update.

Even in professions like public relations, awareness and understanding of what you can and cannot say publicly on social networks from a legal point of view is pretty low, as evidenced by an informal quiz during the Don’t Risk Litigation: Know Your Social Media Law session at the CIPR’s The Public Relations Show 2013 in London last week.

I participated in that session and took part in the quiz, along with the other 50 or so session attendees, being one of only five people left standing by the end of it, ie, we had the correct answers.

You can listen to that session including the quiz in this CIPR podcast:

(If you don’t see the audio player above, listen on SoundCloud.)

In the past, the Attorney General has issued around five advisories per year although the announcement notes that ten have been issued so far in 2013.

Whatever the number, make sure you’re keeping current with the law and social media, especially if you’re a communicator whose clients (or employer) would expect you to know where the line lies between what you can and cannot say online.

Related posts:

On a digital roll at the FT

FT Android edition

If you want evidence that digital and print publications can live together very nicely in the midst of continuing change and declines in circulations and advertising revenues for printed newspapers, look no further than the Financial Times.

In July 2012, the paper reported that, for the first time, digital subscriptions had surpassed print subscriptions.

And in an email today, the FT told me that paid readership – print and digital – is the highest in the paper’s 125-year history at almost 629,000, up 5 percent on the same period last year.

Yet digital is the driving force behind the FT’s growth, clearly a trend where continuing circulation growth has been fuelled by digital subscriptions, the latter up 24 percent to almost 387,000 for the first nine months of 2013 compared to 2012.

fastFTThe FT said they now have close to 150,000 more digital subscribers than global print circulation. And a very interesting metric – the FT has more than 220,000 corporate users from over 3,000 licences, including 25 of the world’s top business schools and 80 central banks.

And the fastFT live 24/7 breaking-news service launched six months ago has been a great success, according to the FT’s Megan Murphy at a celebration event last night at the swanky Morton’s Club in London’s West End.

As a long-time paying subscriber to FT digital content, I’ve seen the paper’s innovation and success with its digital roll-outs. I’m especially impressed with their Android app, my favoured method of reading the FT each day. It works especially well on a 10.1-inch Samsung tablet.

Mobile clearly is a major element in the FT’s vision for its future as the platform drives almost 60 percent of subscriber consumption, over 40 percent of total traffic and a quarter of digital subscriptions.

Yesterday, the FT announced the availability of the FT in the just-launched Google Newsstand on Android devices. You can actually subscribe to the FT via this app – a first via a third-party app, the FT said. And last week, the paper made is easy for subscribers to share limited digital content with non-subscribers via the Gift Article feature.

In addition to Google Newsstand and FT apps for the primary mobile systems – Android, iOS, Windows – you can also get the FT as a Flipboard publication. As an enthusiastic Flipboard user myself,  I flip between the FT app on the tablet and the FT in Flipboard on the tablet and sometimes smartphone, depending on what I’m doing at the time and where.

So much choice!

Related posts:

Inside PR joins the FIR Podcast Network

Inside PR

In April 2006, we were delighted to find a pair of experienced, smart and articulate Canadian communicators had launched a new communications-focused podcast.

Inside PR, with Terry Fallis and David Jones – both of whom worked at the time for Thornley Fallis Public Relations in Toronto – took an agency-centric (and uniquely Canadian) approach to their show. They addressed topics such as when to turn down work because of ethical issues, how not to leave an agency, conflicts of interest, PR measurement and a host of other meaty topics, along with operational matters like agency structure and hourly billing practices.

We became avid listeners to Inside PR, and continued to be devoted to the podcast when, in March 2008, Terry and David (who had by then moved on to a new job) turned the microphone over to Martin Waxman, Keith McArthur and Julie Rusciolelli. The hosting of the show went through a few changes until, in April 2010, Inside PR settled into its current hosting format, with Joe Thornley, Martin Waxman and Gini Dietrich.

Still featuring an agency focus, the show covers PR and social media from a more global perspective, but continues to present a rich conversation sprinkled with the occasional interview on-site reporting from PR events, and other insightful content.

Today, we’re delighted to make it official: Inside PR is joining the FIR Podcast Network. As Joe Thornley reminded us when we spoke about the possibility of including Inside PR in the FIR family of communications-themed podcasts, The Hobson and Holtz Report was the original inspiration for Dave and Terry when they decided to launch their show. (We were humbled and flattered when we first learned that.)

It’s entirely fitting, then, that the shows join forces to expand Inside PR’s reach to FIR listeners, and to introduce FIR’s shows to long-time Inside PR audiences. The weekly podcast will begin appearing in the FIR Podcast Network in the coming weeks.

For those who don’t know the Inside PR hosts, it’s our pleasure to introduce them:

Gini DietrichGini Dietrich is the founder and chief executive officer of Arment Dietrich, Inc., a Chicago-based public relations agency.

The author of Spin Sucks, Gini has delivered numerous keynotes, panel discussions, coaching sessions, and workshops across North America on the subject of using online technology in communication, marketing, sales, and HR.

One of the top rated communication professionals on the social networks, Gini was recently named the number one PR person, according to Klout and TechCrunch, on the channels, and number one on Twitter, according to TweetLevel.

Follow Gini on Twitter at @ginidietrich.

Joe ThornleyJoe Thornley  is CEO of Thornley Fallis and 76design, a company he established in 1995 to provide strategic communications and public relations advice and counsel to senior executives in large public and private sector organizations.  He has more than 25 years of experience providing clients with communications strategies and programs.

Joe has been actively engaged in social media since 2004 when he started exploring wikis, RSS feeds and online communities. He has been blogging at ProPR since 1995.

Joe is a regular speaker, moderator and participant at conferences on public relations, communications and social media. He regularly conducts social media workshops for a variety of organizations. He is the past-chair of the Canadian Council of Public Relations Firms.

Joe holds an Honours B.A. and an M.A. in political science, both from the University of Waterloo.  He completed Ph.D. course work in political science and public administration at Carleton University.

Follow Joe on Twitter at @thornley.

Martin WaxmanMartin Waxman, APR, is a social media and communications strategist, principal of Martin Waxman Communications, senior counselor at Thornley Fallis Communications and co-founder of three PR agencies. He has worked in communications and PR for 25 years, and specializes in social media, consumer marketing, product launches, corporate and internal communications, b2b and entertainment.

He writes a blog, myPALETTE.

Martin received his APR from the Canadian Public Relations Society, guest lectures on PR at universities and community colleges and teaches a social media course at McMaster University. He’s currently past president of the CPRS Toronto board of directors and a member of Counselors Academy’s executive committee.  Martin received an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree in film, television and theatre from York University in Toronto and is the author of two published books of fiction.

Follow Martin on Twitter at @martinwaxman.

(Cross-posted from For Immediate Release, Shel’s and my podcast blog.)

Related post:

Introducing “FIR presents AllthingsIC with Rachel Miller”

The FIR Podcast Network is pleased to announce a new podcast on internal communication that will begin on November 26, 2013. Presenter Rachel Miller explains…

employeegroupsmWho is doing what in the world of internal communication? You’re in the right place to find out.

I’m pleased to be joining the For Immediate Release fold with a brand new podcast, “FIR presents AllthingsIC with Rachel Miller.”

Every month I will be bringing you the latest news and views from an internal communication perspective.

As a keen listener of FIR over the years, I’ve enjoyed hearing Neville and Shel highlighting some of the good work that’s taking place globally with employees at the core.

My new monthly show will complement the existing podcast by showcasing some of the best in class examples of effective internal communication, and also look at what isn’t working so well and what we can learn from it.

I’ll be sharing practical hints and tips in each episode and looking to see what tools and resources are around for IC pros to access. There are thousands of smart people working in internal communication globally and I’d love to hear your thoughts via the FIR community.

I’ve written a blog on internal communication since 2009, and will write an article to accompany each episode of “FIR presents AllthingsIC with Rachel Miller” so you have all the information from each show to hand and can sit back with a cup of tea and listen rather than feeling like you need to make notes.

Each monthly show will be 20-30 minutes long and the first one will be published on 26 November.

I hope you enjoy the show and I look forward to communicating with you.

Rachel

Rachel MillerI’m Rachel Miller, MCIPR, PG (Dip). I’m an internal communication and social media strategist who consults, speaks and blogs on all things internal communication.

In 2013 I was named one of the UK’s leading social business influencers, and was a finalist for CIPR Outstanding PR Professional of the Year (People’s Choice).

Since 2009 I’ve written my own blog which led to Econsultancy recognising me in 2012 as one of the Top UK female bloggers. I was named in PR Week’s Top 29 under 29 professional communicators in the UK list (2009).

Every company is different and a one size fits all approach to communication simply doesn’t work. Though my business, All Things IC, I have the pleasure of working alongside companies to help them achieve communication excellence.

Find out more: www.allthingsic.com.

I’m on Twitter: @AllthingsIC.

(Cross-posted from For Immediate Release, Shel’s and my podcast blog.)

Related post:

From the fingertips of bloggers over 50

The email said, “We have a paying subscriber base of around 550,000 and 1.2 million readers so do expect an increase in visitors – make sure you put your wittiest, wisest comments up around then!”

These were the words of Katy Bravery, editor of Saga magazine, in an email to let me know that this blog, NevilleHobson.com, is one of 50 blogs written by bloggers over the age of 50 that are included in a feature in the September 2013 edition of the magazine, out from today.

50 Over-50 Bloggers

“50 Bloggers Over 50″ presents concise descriptions of Saga’s “pick from the best” (as they say), divided in categories that include culture, politics, food and drink, history, and the all-embracing ‘personal.’

I’m listed there, sandwiched between political blogger and radio show host Iain Dale and Channel 4 News anchor Jon Snow.

It’s quite flattering to be included by Saga and presented to an audience that may not be that new to me as I’m right in the age group Saga serves – those aged 50 and over – with its array of services that include insurance, travel, financial services, healthcare and cruises. Plus the monthly magazine.

Here’s how Saga’s listing describes this blog:

Neville Hobson

Neville describes his blog as being at ‘the intersection of business, communication and technology. And shiny new objects.’ As that final sentence suggests, all this is explained in terms we regular folk can understand.

nevillehobson.com

If you’re visiting this blog having read the feature in September’s Saga magazine, welcome! Let me guide you to a few things that might interest you while you’re here:

  • The Saga description is accurate on what I write about here – topics that are broadly to do with business, communication and technology. I don’t write for a specific age group and you won’t find much about sport or gardening, but a lot about PR and the social web. In short, topics related to business, communication and technology that might interest you whatever your age or your gender.
  • The ‘About‘ page will tell you a  bit more about who I am and what I do.
  • The drop-down menus called ‘Categories’ and ‘Archives’ on the right of your screen (or scroll down to them if you’re reading this on a mobile device) are your access to content I’ve written here since 2006 categorized by specific topic and dated by month. Also see the word cloud – the bigger the word, the more posts on that topic. And of course, the search box.
  • If you’re interested in listening to content, I co-host a weekly business podcast, For Immediate Release: The Hobson and Holtz Report, published on Mondays. There are also occasional podcasts that are book reviews, interviews with interesting people and recordings of speakers at events. Why not give one a try?
  • If you have a tablet like an iPad, you might like to read my Flipboard magazine that contains a wide range of articles on contemporary topics that I find interesting. You might, too.
  • If you’re on Twitter, Facebook or Google+, we can connect there too if you’d like to do that. Or you can just follow if you prefer. I’m also on Instagram and post smartphone snapshots there.

Thanks, I hope you enjoy your visit. Let me know if you do (or even if you don’t).