Meet up with Shel Holtz on his UK trip

Shel HoltzIf you’re a listener to the FIR podcast – specifically, The Hobson and Holtz Report – you’ll know Shel Holtz  as my co-presenter in our weekly show that we began in 2005.

In January 2015, we will celebrate ten years of doing this together.

I’ve known Shel for more than 20 years and, given our physical locations eight hours apart – he’s in California, USA, and I’m in the UK – we don’t get to physically meet up that frequently. In fact, the last time we did was in Amsterdam in 2012; before that, in 2009 when I was in California.

So I’m thrilled that Shel and his wife Michele will be in London later this month and we’ll meet up, and we’ll record one of our weekly shows face to face for a change rather than down the line, as it were, of a Skype call.

You may also know Shel as one of the world’s most renowned corporate communicators and a regular, top-rated conference speaker. He is an accredited member of IABC and an IABC Fellow. His extensive experience embraces strategic corporate and employee communications, corporate public relations, crisis communications, media relations, financial communications, marketing communications, change communications, and compensation and benefit communications.

He is immersed in digital and social communication and also speaks frequently on topics surrounding the application of online technology to strategic organizational communication. (Full bio.)

However you might know Shel, if you want to meet up with him on his UK visit this month, there are at least three opportunities where you can do this:

  • At “Beyond likes and follows: weaving social media into a results-oriented communication strategy,” a two-day workshop in London on October 28-29 organized by the International School of Communication at which Shel will be teaching participants how to apply today’s social media tools and tactics to real-world business challenges and opportunities. This is the primary reason for Shel’s UK visit.
  • At “The keys to digital, social media and content marketing success” in Bath on Monday October 27 where Shel will be the guest speaker at this networking event organized by South West Corporate Communicators and the IABC UK Chapter. SWCC is a terrific LinkedIn group for communicators in southwest England; I’ve spoken at one of their networking events before.
  • Join Shel and I, plus our wives, for an informal “FIR dinner” on Wednesday October 30 in London, actual venue to be decided and booked. The restaurant or pub will be in west London, probably in the Kensington/South Kensington area close to a tube station, leaning towards the £ to ££ price range (so not £££+). We’re thinking of a table of up to 20 depending on how many say they’d like to come, each of us paying our own way. If you would like to come, even without knowing precisely where yet, please leave a (non-binding) comment to this post indicating your wish, or in the FIR Podcasting Community on Google+. We’d be looking at getting together at 7pm.

As Shel would undoubtedly say, hope to see you later this month!

A chat about wearable tech and more

Media Bullseye RoundtableI was honoured to be guest co-host on the Media Bullseye Roundtable podcast this week with Chip Griffin, the founder and CEO of CustomScoop, and the Roundtable’s prime host.

The Media Bullseye Roundtable is a weekly roundtable discussion hosted by Chip and a different guest co-host in each episode, exploring three topical communication-related issues.

In this week’s episode, we spent 30 minutes discussing three terrific topics:

  1. The impact of wearable technology on communicators (a topic I’m very focused on these days, especially in what I see as too much complacency over the lack of clear understanding about wearable tech in the workplace).
  2. The role of social media in international political movements, sparked by an article about recent protests in Hong Kong.
  3. The ways in which communicators have tried to monetize content beyond simply being a marketing tool, inspired by a post on Spin Sucks by Gini Dietrich.

You might enjoy hearing or reading what we discussed that may prompt some thoughts of your own that you can share as part of continuing the conversation.

Listen to the podcast right here:

Chip has also published a transcript so you can read rather than listen if you prefer.

I’ve known Chip for almost a decade since CustomScoop became involved as a sponsor in 2005 of For Immediate Release: The Hobson and Holtz Report podcast that Shel Holtz and I present each week. (CustomScoop offers FIR listeners a free trial of its news and social media monitoring service.)

A few months ago, we were delighted to welcome the Roundtable into the FIR Podcast Network. And Chip started another podcast this month – Chats with Chip – that is the latest network show.

Enjoy the show(s)!

  • If you’d like to contribute comments to this discussion – or about any other topic in FIR Podcast Network content – a good place is the FIR Podcast Community on Google+.

How to get a result with Twitter when email would fail

Against the flow

It started with one tweet.

I bet you get requests like this from PR folk, too. To be frank, I rarely reply any longer as 1) a quick look at my website (the address of which is in my Twitter profile) will easily reveal an email address; and 2) the outcome in my experience from an email pitch that starts like this on Twitter is not usually a worthwhile one.

But there was something about Becky’s request that made me reply, even if a little differently to what she might have expected.

I liked Becky’s engaging, repartee response.

That got a response for Becky.

And a result.

I guarantee you that result would have been unlikely if this conversation had been conducted via email. And it was a conversation, conducted within a space of about an hour, not simply an exchange of email messages that may well have spread over some days.

My advice to PRs when you’re thinking of pitching on Twitter: think outside the box, like Becky.

Related post:

The Apple iOS debacle and PR consequences

iOS 8.0.1 downloading

Whether you’re an iPhone user or not, you can’t have missed the headlines in recent days reporting on the fiasco resulting from Apple’s botched operating system update 8.0.1 for iPhones and iPads, released on September 24.

For the first time in some years, I have an iPhone courtesy of Arena Media, mobile operator Three UK‘s media agency, who sent me an iPhone 6 for review (that review is coming soon) which arrived on the 24th – the day of the 8.0.1 software update.

And so I did: allowed the iPhone to install the update. And, as you do, I tweeted that.

In pretty short order, I started getting tweets from Twitter friends about the problems with the update.

Sure enough, the iPhone 6 had lost its ability to make or receive phone calls and text messages, the problem at the heart of the matter, one that seemed to  affect only the two newest iPhones, the 6 and 6 Plus.

So for the past 36 hours or so, along with thousands of other iPhone 6 users, I’ve had a smartphone with no ability to use it as a phone. Luckily, in my case, it isn’t my primary phone and it otherwise functioned just fine including connectivity via wifi. And so I was able to kick its tyres, as it were, during the Simply SMiLE conference in London yesterday, using many of its features.

And what about fixing the botched update? How hard was Apple on the case?

I imagine this was being treated with the utmost importance by Apple. I visualized their engineers working round the clock to get a fix done in the shortest time possible.  And I guess the shortest time possible was the 36 hours or so from 8.0.1 to the 8.0.2 fix that I saw appear in my iPhone 6 early this morning UK time.

ios802update

iOS 8.0.2 Learn More

And once the installation reached a successful completion, the iPhone 6 had its cellular capability restored and the fixes mentioned in the ‘Learn More’ text applied.

iOS 8.0.2 up to date

And all’s well that ends well, right? Everyone will breathe a sigh of relief. No doubt by this time next week, all this will be just a bad memory, a little one at that (although #BendGate is still ‘an issue’).

And what of Apple the company, one that is the maker of probably the most desirable tech gadgets on the mass market today? Has something gone a bit wrong there where we’ve seen a succession of missteps in recent months: the current issues with the iOS fiasco, for example, and celebrity nude pics in the iCloud a month or so ago?

I expect Apple will continue to feature high up in lists of the world’s best brands. I imagine the rosy glow of success will continue to embrace the company once more news and information emerge about Apple Watch and its launch next year.

So events such as I’ve mentioned may be just a blip on the PR radar to Apple, ones relatively easy to consider and address purely as issues to manage.

Yet I think such events have tarnished Apple’s reputation somewhat. The share price has fallen. The gloss has dimmed a bit on a company which has often in the past said that they make technology that just works.

Not this time, Mr Cook!

Apple share price

I believe there is a cumulative effect over time where things like this add up to a negative sum when it comes to trust and reputation. And, eventually, that will impact you, your products and services and your market position. Not to mention shareholder value.

Not a good place to be, Apple.

Time to create engaged voters

85% voter turnout

The referendum on independence that the voters of Scotland participated in on September 18 was a close result. But the nays had it in the end by a ten percent margin.

What struck me most about this referendum was the voter turnout – almost 85 percent of the 4.2 million Scots registered to vote actually did vote. I’ve seen it reported that this was the highest voter turnout in any election of any type in the United Kingdom since 1918, the year that women won the right to vote.

Clearly there are significant differences in a rare event that can radically change the very nature of a country compared to an election in which you vote your political representatives into a parliament every five years. But surely there are lessons to be learned (the favourite phrase of politicians!) in not only the outcome of this referendum but also the campaigning beforehand and how the passionate minority – politicians and citizens alike – influenced the views of many in the voting majority to actually get out and vote never mind vote in a particular way.

Of all the politicians I saw and heard in the run up to last Thursday’s voting, none had an impact on my thoughts as much as Gordon Brown, the former Prime Minister, in a passionate speech supporting the Union between England and Scotland that he gave the day before voting.

You can listen to it here, see what you think:

(Audio extracted from the BBC News video report available on YouTube.)

I was never impressed with Brown as Prime Minister. But what an orator! In this speech, there was no script in his hands, no prepared statement he read. Just the power of his words and how he spoke them.

Would such passion – believable passion at that, genuine not scripted – make much difference in what voters think and do as politicians make their cases to those voters? Some might say that’s what they already do. I don’t support that view at all, certainly not from watching and listening to almost any politician today.

I think politicians of every stripe should be examining what happened in Scotland last week and considering what they need to do to aim for such high voter turnout when the general election arrives in May 2015.

Do we really want to repeat the dismal showing that saw UK voter turnout of just 36 percent in the European elections earlier this year, and even worse elsewhere in Europe? Surely not. But you have to make it interesting enough for voters to believe they want to become engaged, want to have their say.

You have to persuade voters to believe.

That’s a great deal to do with communication, specifically:

  1. Having a compelling story.
  2. Understanding which media are the most effective means to connect with voters in every single instance of reaching out with your story.
  3. Being honest, open, authentic, credible.
  4. Telling your story really well, in such a way that it will stimulate an action – in this case, engaged voters having their say, too.

Is it possible that politics might get really interesting between now and May 2015?

Related post:

Scotland referendum results via WhatsApp and more

Yes / No

Tomorrow, the United Kingdom will not be the same no matter what happens in Scotland today as citizens there cast their votes in a referendum to decide whether Scotland will separate from the UK and become an independent country, or not.

The campaigning is done; now it’s up to the voters of Scotland to decide what they want for their country and the union with England that’s been in place since 1707.

Obviously media of all types – mainstream, social – and from all over the world are devoting huge time and resources to coverage of an event that has got the world’s attention especially in countries where the flames of separatism may be further fanned on the outcome in Scotland.

I’ll be following events as time permits during the day on TV and online. It’s once the polls close at 10pm tonight that interest will be most strong as the votes are counted with the first results to be declared expected sometime around 3am on Friday morning.

What appeals to me is the idea of key news as it breaks coming to me in a way that lets me focus just on that and gives me just the facts. I can choose whether to look for more detail, if I want, whether that’s online or via more traditional news channels.

So an idea from Channel 4 News in the UK is most interesting – broadcast breaking news on the results as it happens, directly to your smartphone via WhatsApp and Snapchat:

[…] We’re going to publish all of our best content, as well as live updates, via Snapchat and Whatsapp, from the moment the polls close on Thursday night right up to when the results are announced on Friday morning – ahead of publishing it anywhere else.

That last sentence is most interesting: “ahead of publishing it anywhere else.” Before TV?

My interest is WhatsApp; here’s how to set it up:

WhatsApp the message INDYREF to 07768555671 and add us to your contacts list to sign up for all of our best overnight news and analysis, pictures and video, delivered to you ahead of all the other social networks.
If you change your mind, WhatsApp STOP to the same number.

I’d added C4News to my WhatsApp and can’t wait to see how this plays out.

C4News

It’s great to see such innovation from mainstream broadcasters, especially communication methods that clearly show the broadcaster not only gets audience preferences by demographic according to social medium but also is able to execute an idea well.

Channel 4 is not alone in this. BBC News, for instance, announced this week that its content will be available on smartphone instant messaging platform LINE. Earlier this year, the BBC experimented with WhatsApp and WeChat in English and Hindi.

And Sky News launched its Stand Up Be Counted initiative, described as “a place for 16 – 25 year olds to safely upload and share the videos, pictures or blogs they make on the issues that matter most to them.” It’s been a very active place in relation to the Scottish referendum.

Innovation really is thriving.

(Via Journalism.co.uk; picture at top via The Guardian.)