New guide to better understanding social media from the CIPR

Here to helpUnderstanding the social media landscape can be trickier than it might seem.

In the context of how and where social media fits into traditional marketing and communication activity – what it can deliver, how you benchmark it, how you measure the return on your investment, how to understand and assess the risks of using it – it’s sometimes a bigger picture than many people realize.

Today, awareness of and understanding about social media and what it can deliver in a business context is generally high, although I believe too many people lack clear understanding about ‘engagement,’ confusing it with ‘marketing’ (and even ‘selling’).

There’s no end of information, guides and people willing to sell you how-to? advice, training, solutions, what have you. How do you choose a trusted source?

In the area of guides, one proven trusted source is the CIPR, the UK’s professional association for public relations practitioners. They’ve just published an updated edition of their best practice guide on managing social media campaigns.

The Social Media Best Practice Guide addresses and explains the following topics:

  • Definition of social media
  • Dos and don’ts of social media
  • Planning social media
  • Legal considerations
  • Security considerations
  • Advice for employers
  • Social media measurement

The guide includes a credible definition of the term ‘social media’:

Social media is the term commonly given to Internet and mobile-based channels and tools that allow users to interact with each other and share opinions and content. As the name implies, social media involves the building of communities or networks and encouraging participation and engagement.

The 28-page guide is well written and credible in how it approaches each of the topics and explains, in simple terms, what each one means. While its focus is clearly on public relations, it’s a useful publication for anyone in business looking for better understanding about social media.

Take a look. Then download your copy of the PDF – it’s free.

(If you don’t see the document above, see it at Slideshare.)

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