Internet speed

[Click or tap to see larger original]

Although the numbers  have magnified in the year that’s passed since Intel published this graphic representation of what’s happening every minute on the internet, it’s still a terrific visual snapshot of the huge scale and scope of what technologies are enabling people to do.

This attractive graphic – perfect for corporate decks and presentations on tech trends – includes metrics we’re used to seeing these days in reports and projections on the evolving technology and people-behaviour landscape (how many emails sent, Facebook views, new tweets, Google searches, etc).

Intel’s offering simply reinforces the big picture, especially relating to people’s activities across the social web. And, as Intel says, it illustrates that projected future growth is staggering.

Five highlights of what happens in an internet minute:

  • 6 new Wikipedia article published – that’s less than I would imagine: I read the metric as relating to the whole of Wikipedia, ie, across all its 286 language versions. Does it reflect, perhaps, the difficulty perceived by many in getting stuff done on Wikipedia?
  • 20 new victims of identity theft – there’s a metric you don’t tend to see in such reports.
  • 1,300 new mobile users – I bet the big growth in that comes in geographies such as Asia, Africa, Latin America. Note it says ‘mobile’ not ‘smartphones.’
  • 20 million photo views / 3,000 photo uploads – all this before Instagram hit the mainstream with its Android release for mobile devices this year.
  • By 2015 – just 18 months away – the number of networked devices will be twice the number of people in the world in that year. So that’s at least 14 billion devices.

Truly an internet of things.

(Via World Bank)

Related posts:

About Neville Hobson

Entrepreneurial business communicator with a curiosity for tech and how people use it. Early adopter (and leaver) and experimenter with social media. Co-host of the weekly business podcast For Immediate Release: The Hobson and Holtz Report. Also an occasional test pilot of shiny new objects. Follow me on Twitter and Google+.